ATTI

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AcronymDefinition
ATTIAttitude
ATTIAssociation of Teachers in Technical Institutions (now National Association of Teachers in Further and Higher Education)
ATTIAdvanced Transportation Technology Institute
ATTIAdvanced Tracking Technologies, Inc. (est. 1998; Houston, TX)
ATTIAdvanced Technology Transfer and Infusion (JPL)
ATTIAcoustic Test Target Insertion
ATTIAmerican Telephone and Telegraph Interchange
References in classic literature ?
That it denoted jealousy I could not say, and yet, judging all things by mundane standards as I still did, I felt it safer to affect indifference in the matter until I learned more surely Sola's attitude toward the object of my solicitude.
To all this the captive made no reply; but was content to preserve an attitude in which dignity was singularly blended with disdain.
But he's coming very slowly--and what curious attitudes he goes into
While within the influence of the lingering sunbeams, her attitude seemed indicative of joy -- but sorrow deformed it as she passed within the shade.
Gerasim looked cautiously into the study several times and saw Pierre always sitting in the same attitude.
You are adopting an attitude, sir," he said, "which, however much I may admire it from one point of view, seems to me scarcely to take into account the facts of the situation.
When he paused to contemplate the attitude of the police toward himself and his fellows, he believed that they were the only men in the city who had no rights.
Something in the attitude made the intruders halt when they had barely passed the threshold.
She would go and fawn upon him slavelike--for this would have to be her attitude, of course--and maybe she would find that time had modified him, and that he would be glad to see his long-forgotten old nurse and treat her gently.
His garmenture was that of the ordinary Malay boatman, but there was that in his mien and his attitude toward his companions which belied his lowly habiliments.
I did not catch what was going on at first, and was, therefore, extremely surprised at noticing George hurriedly smooth out his trousers, ruffle up his hair, and stick his cap on in a rakish manner at the back of his head, and then, assuming an expression of mingled affability and sadness, sit down in a graceful attitude, and try to hide his feet.
He spoke in French, and held his hands in the attitude of prayer, so that he quite entirely misled the ruffians, who had no idea that he was communicating with the boy.