ATTYGEN

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ATTYGENAttorney General
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CJP said that all the lawyers and judges were sad over her demise but the Attorney General cannot be facilitated in this matter.
states), (16) voter preferences, attorney general priorities, and state
32) of the choices facing an attorney general, and in that effort, he succeeds.
Richman made his request to the attorney general based on a recent report by the Kroll Audit Committee that found intentional underfunding of the $1.
Maloney, who has raised over $1 million for his campaign, is one of six attorney general candidates who have filed to run in New York's Democratic primary on September 12.
1, 2005 and affects charitable corporations, unincorporated associations and charitable trusts that are required to file reports with the attorney general.
The statute doesn't specify any penalty for its violation, and Melissa Merz, a press secretary for the attorney general, would not comment further.
42) The Witness Security Reform Act of 1984 changed this position by requiring the attorney general to consider the danger a protected witness poses to the relocation community.
On the other side is the Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance, a charity watchdog organization, which has filed a brief supporting the Illnois attorney general.
Several health-care providers have terminated contracts with HMOs, according to the attorney general.
A graduate of Georgetown Law School and former chief of staff to the assistant attorney general in the Clinton administration, Powell will have to deal with issues that grew out of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, as well as increasing entrepreneurship opportunities for minorities (see "Could It Be a Brighter Day for the Broadcast Industry," Newspoints, this issue).
Charged with the constitutional duty to see that laws are faithfully executed, the president appoints an attorney general who oversees more than 100,000 employees, including 7,000 litigating lawyers, and a $12 billion dollar department including such disparate functions as prison management, immigration management, and the F.