BARO


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AcronymDefinition
BAROBarometer
BAROBarometric
BAROBetter Access to Radiation Oncology (Australia)
References in periodicals archive ?
We re caught in this clash," said Mithun Baro, a resident.
BARO Applied Technology, a subsidiary of global retail lighting giant BARO Lighting, has launched in the UK and Ireland its range of UVC air and surface disinfection systems to the food industry.
Baro has 17 years working on radiation curing technology.
Earlier Mr Campbell courageously cleared passengers from the carriage, including young mum Nadia Baro and her eight-month-old son.
Nadia Baro, 26, was wi th son Marc when Ramzi Mohammed turned his rucksack bomb towards her before trying to detonate the device.
going, going Montse Baro (left) and David Steedman (right) with Technical College hairdressing students Claire Lockwood and Kerri O'Brien and without their locks (right) Montse and David lose their locks for charity .
He and Mrs Baro were among up to 30 passengers in Mohammed's carriage on the northbound Northern Line Tube train, which was travelling between Stockwell and Oval when he allegedly tried to detonate his homemade bomb.
Despite being 'cowed' by the blast, Mr Campbell told the jury how he helped Mrs Baro and her son out of the carriage, before turning to confront the alleged bomber - who had smoke coming from his back.
2 last year in a hiding place in Geulumpang Baro in Aceh Pidie Regency.
With regard to literacy development, for instance, the data collected at Baro and Narandoo indicates that a far more complex and holistic view of children's experience with language, print and meaning is needed than that on which the schools' success is formally judged.
The baro, or sleeved, collarless blouse, is made of a sheer lightweight fabric decorated with embroideries.
In the "Imperialism" essay, he couples two critics of decidedly different gifts, Greenberg and Gene Baro, for the purpose of citing their "pontificating pompousness," "arrogance," and "rudeness" (traits not unknown in Britain during its own period of empire).