BICRA

AcronymDefinition
BICRABanking Industry Country Risk Assessment (Standard & Poor's)
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Standard & Poor's uses the BICRA economic risk and industry risk scores to determine a bank's anchor, the starting point in assigning an issuer credit rating to a bank under our bank criteria.
A BICRA is scored on a scale from 1 to 10, ranging from the lowest-risk banking systems (group 1) to the highest-risk (group 10).
The agency said the BICRA change reflected a moderate improvement in Turkey's economic stability and its credit risk profile as well as an improvement in banking regulations and reduced lending share of poor performing state-owned banks.
Our bank criteria use our BICRA economic risk and industry risk scores to determine a bank's anchor, the starting point in assigning an issuer credit rating.
In the GCC, S&P affirmed the BICRA score on Qatar at 4, changed the BICRA score on Kuwait and Oman from 5 to 4, Saudi Arabia from 3 to 2, UAE from 4 to 5 and Bahrain from 5 to 6.
Other countries in BICRA "Group 8" are Argentina, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, and Tunisia, as reported by Lebanon This Week, the economic publication of the Byblos Bank Group.
The BICRA groups summarise S&Ps views of particular country's banking risks and how those risks compare to those in other countries' banking industries.
We classify the banking sector of Egypt in BICRA group '10' along with Belarus, Greece, Jamaica, and Ukraine under our Banking Industry Country Risk Assessment (BICRA) methodology.
If we revised upward our assessment of the BICRA for the UAE, we could consider a one-notch improvement in the bank's SACP.
A positive rating action, if any, would likely result from an upward revision of the assessment of S&P's economic or industry risk score of the UAE in relation to the BICRA assessment.
It also maintained its scores on the two main BICRA components, economic risk and industry risk, at '9' and '6', respectively.
The BICRA score of '8' factors in regular periods of surges in nonperforming loans (NPLs) and weakening financial profiles resulting from endogenous and exogenous crises, such as the tourism crisis in the early 2000s.