CALLS


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AcronymDefinition
CALLSCoalition for Affordable Local and Long-distance Service (AT&T, Sprint, GTE, Bellsouth)
CALLSCognitive Assessment of Later Life Status (neuropsychological assessment)
CALLSCalifornia Academia Libraries List of Serials
CALLSCommunity Adult Literacy and Learning Society (Canada)
CALLSCaribbean Automated Long Lines Service
References in classic literature ?
They call me Miss Jessie; and Kearney, the little one, asked me if Christie played.
Neither did her face--with the brown ringlets on either side, and the slightly piquant nose, and the wholesome bloom, and the clear shade of tan, and the half dozen freckles, friendly remembrances of the April sun and breeze--precisely give us a right to call her beautiful.
It remarkably characterised the incomplete morality of the age, rigid as we call it, that a licence was allowed the seafaring class, not merely for their freaks on shore, but for far more desperate deeds on their proper element.
And every now and then he turns upon his companions, nodding, signaling, beckoning frantically--with every inch of him appealing, imploring, in behalf of the muses and their call.
But you can call it Italy if it makes you less unhappy.
In the earlier days of freedom almost every coloured man who learned to read would receive "a call to preach" within a few days after he began reading.
Every day we were in the Gardens we paid a call at the nest, taking care that no cruel boy should see us, and we dropped crumbs, and soon the bird knew us as friends, and sat in the nest looking at us kindly with her shoulders hunched up.
Hesiod in his Book about Stars tells us their names as follows: `Nymphs like the Graces (1), Phaesyle and Coronis and rich-crowned Cleeia and lovely Phaco and long-robed Eudora, whom the tribes of men upon the earth call Hyades.
These three he calls the act, the content and the object.
I call the dog Gorer," said Sir Pitt; "he's killed a man that dog has, and is master of a bull, and the mother I used to call Flora; but now I calls her Aroarer, for she's too old to bite.
By his skill in necromancy he has a power of calling whom he pleases from the dead, and commanding their service for twenty-four hours, but no longer; nor can he call the same persons up again in less than three months, except upon very extraordinary occasions.
One of the most renowned is the Queen of Sheba, mentioned in Scripture, whom the natives call Nicaula or Macheda, and in their translation of the gospel, Nagista Azeb, which in their language is Queen of the South.