CMSW

AcronymDefinition
CMSWCertified Master Social Worker
CMSWConference of Major Superiors of Women (est. 1956)
CMSWChaska Middle School West (Chaska, MN)
CMSWCritical Management Studies Workshop
CMSWCooroy Mountain Spring Water (Cooroy, QLD, Australia)
CMSWCelebrating Men, Satisfying Women (workshop)
CMSWCentral Medical Services of Westrock (New York)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to an article about the conversion project in the Cushwa Center's newsletter, History of Women Religious, critics say Neal and CMSW used leading questions not to measure sisters' willingness to change, but to promote a particular form of change and to urge discontent with convent life.
Nevertheless, corpus technologies are constantly evolving and improving, as Beavan illustrates in his discussion of new tools including the award-winning 'Collocate Cloud', developed for use with SCOTS, CMSW and the British National Corpus (BNC).
The Enroller project, more fully known as An Enhanced Repository for Language and Literature Researchers, is based at Glasgow University, and allows simultaneous searching of a number of resources already mentioned--SCOTS, CMSW, DSL and HTE-together with the Newcastle Electronic Corpus of Tyneside English, The Helsinki Corpus of English Texts, and Hansard 1805-2003.
Although the author of the letters is a Scot, these are written in Standard English; the CMSW is merely used as a source for the two letters.
The CMSW is also used, in the same inessential way, in Chapter 2 (Jennifer Bann).
The next step in the current investigation is therefore to analyze how these forms are employed in both the Stevenson (RLS) corpus and in CMSW, the control corpus.
As for the control corpus, the imaginative prose section of CMSW comprises 18 documents published between 1765 and 1927 (5.
The occurrences of boy, girl, kid, lad(die), lass(ock)(ie), man, quean and woman were then counted in both CMSW and in the RLS corpus using Wordsmith Tools (Scott, 2004); vocative forms were identified on the basis of a close qualitative reading of the occurrences; finally, figures were normalized per 10,000 words.
The co-text in which instances of boy, girl, lad(die), lass(ock)(ie), (my) man and woman are recorded appears to show a greater density of Scots lexical items and/or grammatical features in the CMSW texts than in the RLS ones.
The study first presented an overview of such occurrences in the RLS corpus and in CMSW, a recently-launched corpus of which the nineteenth-century imaginative prose section functioned as a control corpus.
The Sister Formation Conference was no longer an independent movement but a committee under CMSW.