CCBR

(redirected from Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve)
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AcronymDefinition
CCBRCentral California BMW (Bayerische Motoren Werke) Riders (Pleasant Hill, CA)
CCBRCenter for Clinical and Basic Research (Denmark)
CCBRCanadian Conference on Broadband Research
CCBRChamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve (Mexico)
CCBRCook County Board of Review (Illinois)
CCBRConfiguration Control Board Request
CCBRCelibate Cuddle-Buddy Roomie
References in periodicals archive ?
In July 2009 we collected five frogs (mean snout-vent length 87 mm [range = 80-92 mm]) on vegetation and in water from a breeding chorus in a temporary pond at a pristine tropical dry forest in the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve, Jalisco (19[degrees]30'02"N, 105[degrees]02'04"W, elevation 50 m).
d) Jalisco, on vegetation and in water from a breeding chorus in a temporary pond at a pristine tropical dry forest in the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve.
Our research area in the state of Jalisco, is the 13,000 hectare (ha) Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve, which is Mexico's only protected piece of dry forest.
MATERIALS AND METHODS--This study was conducted within and around the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve (Chamala-Cuixmala BR, 19[degrees]22'-19[degrees]39'N, 104[degrees]56'-105[degrees]10'W), Jalisco, Mexico.
Materials and Methods--Field observations were made in tropical deciduous forest of the 13,200-ha Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve on the Pacific lowlands of Jalisco, Mexico (19[degrees]22-35'N, 104[degrees]56'-105[degrees]03'W).
a non-predator and non-parasitic species), a common element from the avian community of the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve, the bright-rumped attila (Atila spadiceus).
Discussion--Our observations confirm that incursion of cowbirds in the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve is rare (see Hutto, 1986, to compare abundance of cowbirds with other species in our study sites) and parasitism remains low, probably affecting only a few species, the most prominent of which being the black-capped gnatcatcher.
In the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve, the yellow-green vireo apparently has been successful in driving from their nests the few potential parasitic cowbirds.