COPRO

(redirected from Co-production)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
COPROCo-PROduction
References in periodicals archive ?
The co-production agreement finalised in the margins of the recent Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement negotiations will open up access to a larger pool of talent, expertise and infrastructure, with the costs of production also being shared.
Crawford said he is excited to see NHNZ's relationship with China is being deepened and noted the launch of the feature film co-production fund and an upcoming delegation visit to China would unveil more projects.
New Delhi, Feb 24 ( ANI ): India and Canada have signed an Audio-Visual Co-Production Agreement which will enable Indian and Canadian film producers to utilize a platform for collaboration on various facets of film making.
To this end, the Luxor Film Festival for European and Egyptian films hosted a symposium to discuss co-production between Europe and the southern Mediterranean on Friday, 24 January, moderated by French expert Catherine Buresi.
We've received supporting statements from co-production advocates from USA, Canada, Australia, Scotland and England.
This Ausfilm Television Week builds on previous co-production events and is an excellent opportunity to explore the new incentive and program for high-end TV drama from both our countries," said Debra Richards, CEO, Ausfilm.
The first principle of co-production is reciprocity.
The co-production market also matches the short-listed director/producer teams with specialists in film production, sales, distribution and funding to further their projects.
The Film Co-production Agreement will be administered by SARFT Film Bureau and Media Development Authority (MDA), on behalf of China and Singapore,respectively.
PAMS is a proven industry leader in providing co-production, data processing and destination entry services on behalf of its clientele.
Co-production for a Maori environment is a broad concept and approach.
The Jamaican case study and experience in the Caribbean suggest that co-production treaties are useful tools for small developing economies to move up the value chain in the creative economy, but they are not a substitute for a comprehensive framework for creative industries, supported by ongoing policy initiatives.