FAAGL

AcronymDefinition
FAAGLFoundation of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists
References in classic literature ?
To watch, teach, "form" little Flora would too evidently be the making of a happy and useful life.
Blomefield, the vicar, had a large family of boys and girls; sometimes they used to come and play with Miss Jessie and Flora.
At the captain's door the girl held out her hand, with a certain emphasis; and John took it and kept it a little longer, and said, 'Good-night, Flora, dear,' and was instantly thrown into much fear by his presumption.
The submarine flora struck me as being very perfect, and richer even than it would have been in the arctic or tropical zones, where these productions are not so plentiful.
That Miss Flora Millar, the lady who had caused the disturbance, has actually been arrested.
The African oil-tree rose above the mass, with leaves fifteen feet in length upon its stalk, the latter studded with sharp thorns; the bombax, or silk-cotton-tree, filled the wind, as it swept by, with the fine down of its seeds; the pungent odors of the pendanus, the "kenda" of the Arabs, perfumed the air up to the height where the Victoria was sailing; the papaw-tree, with its palm-shaped leaves; the sterculier, which produces the Soudan-nut; the baobab, and the banana-tree, completed the luxuriant flora of these inter-tropical regions.
Also a few pages might have been given up profitably to the consideration of the indigenous flora and fauna of Kukuanaland.
Why, Robert sent word down by his daughter Nancy and she said you wanted a girl--didn't she Flora Jane?
Cultivated plains soon appear, where are united all the productions of the northern and tropical floras, terminating in prairies abounding with pineapples and yams, tobacco, rice, cotton-plants, and sugar-canes, which extend beyond reach of sight, flinging their riches broadcast with careless prodigality.
De Candolle has well remarked in his great and admirable work, that floras gain by naturalisation, proportionally with the number of the native genera and species, far more in new genera than in new species.
The Flora of the Galapagos Archipelago is the subject of a separate memoir by him, in the 'Linnean Transactions.
He ate his lunch impenetrably, sitting opposite Flora de Barral, and then, on some excuse, closeted himself with the woman whom little Fyne's charity described (with a slight hesitation of speech however) as his "Aunt.