FRND

(redirected from Fair, Reasonable and Non-Discriminatory)
AcronymDefinition
FRNDFair, Reasonable and Non-Discriminatory (intellectual property licensing)
FRNDFatigue Related Neurological Dysfunction
References in periodicals archive ?
As one of the world s leading technology innovators, ZTE is committed to fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) principles in its intellectual property policies.
The FTC accused Google of failing to license its standard essential patents on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms.
According to the report, in return for being granted such status the company commits itself to licensing an invention under Frand rules, meaning the terms must be fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory.
Samsung remains committed to licensing our technologies on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms, and we strongly believe it is better when companies compete fairly in the marketplace, rather than in court," Samsung said in a statement.
The Commission will investigate, in particular, whether in doing so Samsung has failed to honour its commitment given in 1998 to the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) to license any standard essential patents relating to European mobile telephony standards on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) terms.
evidence-based, fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory and allow Batelco to
The order sets fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms and conditions and charges for Batelco's LLU and related additional services.
Pricing on a fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory basis
Nokia said that it is asking the court to order Qualcomm to abide by its written contractual obligations to international standards setting organisations to license intellectual property essential to GSM and UMTS technology standards on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms.
After a contentious February WAP Forum meeting in Rome, the group acknowledged the patent, and Geoworks is now in full pursuit of the "licensing of its patented technology on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms and conditions," according to a company statement.
As a leading technology innovator, ZTE respects the intellectual property of other companies and is willing to negotiate royalty fees with license holders based on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) principles.
According to Reuters, Google would not comment on reports of an impending suit, saying only "we take our commitments to license on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms very seriously.