FFCRA

(redirected from Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act)
AcronymDefinition
FFCRAFederal Fair Credit Reporting Act (consumer credit law)
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, the requirements of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and various state and local laws with which employers must comply often are overlooked.
These vendors are considered specialty consumer reporting agencies, are subject to the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), and have been providing these account screening services to financial institutions for years.
While the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires screening companies to maintain procedures to allow consumers to dispute inaccuracies in their reports, the law allows up to 30 days for an investigation of a dispute.
A recent amendment to the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide consumer reporting companies to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months.
The laws include the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act, all with their many regulations and amendments, as well as recently-enacted state laws.
violated the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act by not sending out adverse action notices when a consumer's credit information resulted in the consumer receiving a higher rate
Under the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, insurance companies must send adverse action notices to consumers whenever insurance premiums or rates are increased based on a credit score.
THE NINTH CIRCUIT Court of Appeals last week reversed a lower court ruling and said that portions of a strong California privacy law are preempted by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.
FCRA, the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, applies to employers who conduct background checks on applicants and employees.
The process, which is fully compliant with the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), includes running all triggered consumers through Experian's "Do Not Solicit" database to ensure appropriate consumers receive offers of credit.
One reason for not accepting a single credit report may exist within privacy provisions of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.
Under terms of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, borrowers have the right to see their credit reports.
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