INSIPID


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AcronymDefinition
INSIPIDInadequate Sensitivity Improvement by Proton Indirect Detection
References in classic literature ?
But I as ever partial to what is termed in the 'Young Men's Own Book'--'the society of virtuous and intelligent young ladies;' and in the absence of the mermaids, the amusement became dull and insipid.
Beware my Laura (she would often say) Beware of the insipid Vanities and idle Dissipations of the Metropolis of England; Beware of the unmeaning Luxuries of Bath and of the stinking fish of Southampton.
It is an insipid fruit at the best; but a good apricot is eatable, which none from my garden are.
From this moment, music, lights, flowers, beauties, all became odious and insipid to Louis XIV.
Another of a yellow color, and of the size and taste of the large red currant, the bush four or five feet high; and the third a beautiful scarlet, resembling the strawberry in sweetness, though rather insipid, and growing on a low bush.
This was not insipid, single-word talk of drummer-boys.
The comfort, the freedom, the gaiety of the room was over, hushed into cold composure, determined silence, or insipid talk, to meet the heartless elegance of her father and sister.
He is quite agreeable enough, however, to afford me amusement, and to make many of those hours pass very pleasantly which would otherwise be spent in endeavouring to overcome my sister-in-law's reserve, and listening to the insipid talk of her husband.
Or is it that you like its bitter flavor--that the clear, limpid water is insipid to your palate and that the pollution of its after-course gives it a relish to your lips?
Fortune seemed to be beaming upon him with almost insipid sweetness.
Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel-writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding -- joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets on such works, and scarcely ever permitting them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she accidentally take up a novel, is sure to turn over its insipid pages with disgust.
It was not at all insipid, but it was not exactly expressive; and though it was eminently delicate, Winterbourne mentally accused it--very forgivingly--of a want of finish.