IRV


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AcronymDefinition
IRVInstant-Runoff Voting
IRVIrvine (Amtrak station code; Irvine, CA)
IRVInternal Read Visibility
IRVInternational Reference Version
IRVInspiratory Reserve Volume
IRVInverse Ratio Ventilation
IRVImproved Recovery Vehicle
IRVImmediate Response Vehicle (insurance companies)
IRVIntegrated Voice Response (telephony)
IRVIsotope Reentry Vehicle
IRVInitial Response Vehicle
IRVImperial Romulan Vessel (fictional)
IRVIrvington District (Fremont, California)
References in periodicals archive ?
The classic case study for how IRV would work might be the election of 2000.
The voters of Oakland, California; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Piece County, Washington passed ballot measures for IRV in the November 2006 elections.
What would have happened in 1968 with IRV, for example, when the anti-Vietnam War movement was left without a champion in the general election, and Richard Nixon narrowly edged out Hubert Humphrey?
Democrats must have wished many times throughout the 2004 presidential campaign that Florida and other battleground states were using IRV.
In the middle to late 1990s, many Greens used to say that they hoped that they would spoil elections because this would be the only way to push Democrats into working for IRV.
com) with an interactive "try it" feature, allowing folks to test-drive the IRV process.
Supporters in states and cities where IRV is being considered tend to be those most disenfranchised by the current plurality system--not only the independent parties, but some major parties, like the Democrats in New Mexico, who have been losing close races to Republicans partly became of support for Green candidates.
But he said: "The membership of IRV resigned from other organisations, they weren't expelled.
Full representation may be the Holy Grail for Greens, but IRV is a practical reform that completely reverses the "spoiler" dynamic that does so much to dampen serious consideration of third party candidates.
In March 2002, San Francisco voters supported IRV for citywide elections by an impressive 55 to 45 percent margin, while citizens at over fifty town meetings across Vermont overwhelmingly voted to urge state lawmakers to adopt IRV for statewide elections.
Vermont, Alaska and New Mexico are also considering IRV proposals.
Despite well-financed defenders of the status quo who spent perhaps $100,000 or more trying to confuse voters with slick mailings, San Francisco became the first major American city to use IRV to elect its officials.