LAPS


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AcronymDefinition
LAPSLight Addressable Potentiometric Sensor
LAPSLAN Adapter and Protocol Support
LAPSLimited Area Prediction System
LAPSLos Angeles Poly Support
LAPSLakewood Area Paranormal Society (California)
LAPSLimited Area Prediction Scheme
LAPSLow Altitude Proximity Sensor
LAPSLaptop ASW Prediction System
LAPSLinear Automatic Protection Switch
LAPSOn Line Arrest Processing System (NYPD)
LAPSLark Angling Preservation Society (Mildenhall Suffolk, England)
LAPSLink Access Procedure for SDH
LAPSLos Alamos Public Schools (New Mexico)
References in classic literature ?
It put the writing-case back on the lap of the living woman.
I have seen nothing but the writing-case lifted from my lap.
She was pale and quiet as a meditative statue, clasping her hands on her lap.
Joseph, you calico beastie, don't you dare jump on my lap.
He laid himself back in his chair, and puffed out his smoke, with eyes lazily half closed, like the eyes of the pug-dog on his lap.
He pushed his pug-dog off his lap, dived under the table, appeared again with an old boot and a bottle of blackening, and set to work with tigerish activity.
I asked, and she replied that I could put it wherever I liked for all she cared, so long as I took it out of her sight (the implication was that it had stolen on to her lap while she was looking out at the window).
Whenever I had a mind to see the town, it was always in my travelling-closet; which Glumdalclitch held in her lap in a kind of open sedan, after the fashion of the country, borne by four men, and attended by two others in the queen's livery.
One of them now noticed a gold ring still remaining on the little finger of the murdered girl, and as he could not draw it off easily, he took a hatchet and cut off the finger; but the finger sprang into the air, and fell behind the cask into the lap of the girl who was hiding there.
One of the linen chests was open; the silver teapot was unwrapped from its many folds of paper, and the best china was laid out on the top of the closed linen-chest; spoons and skewers and ladles were spread in rows on the shelves; and the poor woman was shaking her head and weeping, with a bitter tension of the mouth, over the mark, "Elizabeth Dodson," on the corner of some tablecloths she held in her lap.
So she dropped the lump into my lap just at that moment, and I clapped my legs together on it and she went on talking.
Dickon had carried it over the moor in his arms and its feeding bottle was in his pocket with a squirrel, and when Mary had sat under a tree with its limp warmness huddled on her lap she had felt as if she were too full of strange joy to speak.