MESCAL


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
MESCALModern Embedded Systems Compilers Architectures and Languages
References in periodicals archive ?
I sipped my $4 top-shelf mescal and watched the crowd, all Mexicans, casual but well-dressed, the Tijuana of young creative types.
The spirit appeals to travelers who have tasted mescal in Mexico and to mixologists who have embraced the smoky spirit as a differentiating ingredient in cocktails.
The friend's family made mescal, and Murrieta was inspired to take the beverage to a new audience.
Drink: Natural beer and wine; hand-crafted cocktails focusing on tequila and mescal, with ingredients like beet juice, cilantro syrup and edible flowers
The bar flaunts more than 50 tequilas, an assortment of more obscure Latin spirits such as mescal, pisco, cachaca and quality rums.
In one case, the ingestion of mescal buttons (which Sleigh learned about from his friend Havelock Ellis) allows someone to see the fairy world.
But much remains: a shelf of bottles--whisky, mescal, tequila--most still half full.
Nevertheless, Parker admitted to a friend that he really did "not know anything about this peculiar habit of eating mescal buttons.
Patron started the sagebrush rebellion that brought tequila into the main-stream with the wonders of the cactus juice done right, smashing tequila's reputation as an evil twin of agave-based mescal ("Eat the worm
Secondly, there was the Chiricahuas' thirst for alcoholic beverages, which included tiswin prepared from corn sprouts and mescal purchased in Mexico, that inevitably undercut efforts to locate these tribesmen on permanent reservations in the U.
Instead, Americans have loved and consumed Mexican food in large quantities almost from the moment it was available--from canned chili and tamales in the early 20th century to fast-food tacos in the 1960s, sit-down eateries in the 1970s, and ultra-pricey hipster mescal bars today.
In Mexico, this weevil causes economic losses in tequila, mescal, henequen, and Mexican tuberose production (Camino et al.