MFAA

AcronymDefinition
MFAAMortgage and Finance Association of Australia
MFAAMacromedia Flash Advertising Alliance
MFAAMissouri Fine Arts Academy
MFAAMuseum for African Art (New York, NY; est. 1984)
MFAAMed Flight Air Ambulance
MFAAMassive Fire Power Aircraft
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1954 Hague Convention also adopted examples from the Kunstschutz and MFAA organization in its article on "Occupation," which significantly reinforces the hostilities-occupation dichotomy.
18) The MFAA then took temporary possession of both collections, done 'in the care of the US Army', assigned a complete inventory to be made by art historian Dr Erik Berger of 'all treasures of questionable ownership', then summoned both Haberstock and Gurlitt for later questioning at Wurzburg.
In fact, three Worcester Art Museum directors and a curator were either Monuments Men or served on the Roberts Commission, an organization that directed the establishment of MFAA.
In mid-1949, the Department inherited authority for the remaining collecting points and MFAA personnel in the U.
He was commissioned in the British Army in 1938, joining the intelligence corps, and was transferred to the MFAA after 7, y the ceasefire in 1945.
He was quickly released to help the MFAA men in Munich.
The MFAA officers in the field found frequent instances of looting, mayhem, and the thoughtless use of books and manuscripts.
We discovered what was problematic with Flash ads was the ability to track them," says Whitney Allen, Macromedia's manager of the MFAA.
The MFAA men themselves are rendered similarly vague.
ed Fife-born artist William Gear was a part of the MFAA, while Edinburgh-based Professor FAA F , rofessor Kenneth Steer, who devoted his civilian life to protecting historic and artistic monuments in Scotland, was one of the most famous British members.
While the war wound down, the MFAA had little logistical support from the military, not even a jeep.
The commission included MFAA Officers (Monuments, Fine Arts and Officers Files) charged to assist the forces on the ground in the recovery of works of art.