MYLF

(redirected from Mountain yellow-legged frog)
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AcronymDefinition
MYLFMountain Yellow-Legged Frog
MYLFMontana Youth Leadership Forum (Helena, MT)
MYLFMichigan Youth Leadership Forum (Lansing, MI)
MYLFMassachusetts Youth Leadership Foundation (Braintree, MA)
References in periodicals archive ?
The mountain yellow-legged frog is one of three frogs or toads on the federal Endangered Species List in Southern California.
It appears that a "perfect storm" of factors--including chytrid fungus outbreaks, habitat destruction, water pollution, and global climate change --is hastening the range-wide decline of the mountain yellow-legged frog.
Two or 3 inches long, its top side mottled with blotches that are usually yellow and brown, the mountain yellow-legged frog was the most common found in the San Gabriel Mountains before 1970.
Also available are more than a dozen ringtones of endangered and threatened North American frogs and toads, such as the Mountain Yellow-legged Frog, denizen of high elevation lakes in the Sierra Nevada and Southern California, and the Houston Toad, found only at a few locations in Texas.
The practice may have helped eliminate some of the last fishless refuges for the mountain yellow-legged frog in the Sierra.
In the last century, the mountain yellow-legged frog, Rana muscosa, has led the declining populations of amphibians throughout the Sierra Nevada, thinning to 20 percent of its historic territory.
list; the mountain yellow-legged frog and Yosemite toads have been proposed for listing.
Forest Service biologist Laura Conway indicated that grazing was probably driving at least three wildlife species in the Emigrant toward extinction: the Yosemite toad, the mountain yellow-legged frog, and the Sierra Nevada snowshoe hare.
Two or three inches long, its top side mottled with blotches that are usually yellow and brown, the mountain yellow-legged frog before 1970 was the most common in the San Gabriel Mountains.
The mountain yellow-legged frog is one of the most endangered creatures in southern California.
Mountain Yellow-legged Frog (Rana muscosa) The southern California distinct population segment of the mountain yellow-legged frog was listed July 2 as endangered.
Higher up Little Rock Creek lives another creature, the mountain yellow-legged frog, she added.