NATURE


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AcronymDefinition
NATURENovel Approaches to Theories Underlying Requirements Engineering
NATURENational Association for Trade Union Research and Education (est. 1998; Sri Lanka)
References in classic literature ?
It is the universal nature which gives worth to particular men and things.
Praise is looked, homage tendered, love flows, from mute nature, from the mountains and the lights of the firmament.
Too feeble fall the impressions of nature on us to make us artists.
For nature is as truly beautiful as it is good, or as it is reasonable, and must as much appear as it must be done, or be known.
The very strict discipline was no doubt of much value in giving firmness and definite direction to his irregular nature, and the range of his studies, both in literature and in other fields, was very wide.
Already as a boy, though normal and active, he began to be sensitive to the Divine Power in Nature which in his mature years he was to express with deeper sympathy than any poet before him.
Again, those species which are distinguished one from another and opposed one to another within the same genus are said to be 'simultaneous' in nature.
Those things, therefore, are said to be 'simultaneous' in nature, the being of each of which involves that of the other, while at the same time neither is in any way the cause of the other's being; those species, also, which are distinguished each from each and opposed within the same genus.
It has been seen in the last chapter that amongst organic beings in a state of nature there is some individual variability; indeed I am not aware that this has ever been disputed.
But Natural Selection, as we shall hereafter see, is a power incessantly ready for action, and is as immeasurably superior to man's feeble efforts, as the works of Nature are to those of Art.
I said; how shall we find a gentle nature which has also a great spirit, for the one is the contradiction of the other?
Nor do we need to seek any other reason for the number of these pellicles beyond this that the orifice of the venous artery being of an oval shape from the nature of its situation, can be adequately closed with two, whereas the others being round are more conveniently closed with three.