NCCJ

AcronymDefinition
NCCJNational Conference for Community and Justice (formerly National Conference of Christians and Jews)
NCCJNational Conference of Christians and Jews (now the National Conference for Community and Justice)
NCCJNortheast Conference for Community and Justice (Cleveland, OH)
NCCJNorwegian Chamber of Commerce in Japan
NCCJNational Council of Community and Justice
NCCJNetherlands Chamber of Commerce in Japan
References in periodicals archive ?
Hugo of the Hills, Muslim Unity Center, Kirk in the Hills, Temple Beth El, NCCJ Interfaith Partners and Pathways to Peace Foundation.
The NCCJ (The National Conference for Community and Justice of Michigan) is a non-profit organization that seeks to reduce discrimination and racism by working proactively across racial, religious, ethnic and other cultural boundaries.
The mission of the NCCJ is critically important because social justice and fairness must be a right for all.
Carol Bartz and Judge Len Edwards have both done so much to advance women and youth from every walk of life in this valley," said Bart Charlow, NCCJ Silicon Valley Executive Director.
The success of using proactive diversity practices that are aligned with a company's key business outcomes is changing the way organizations think about the value of diversity initiatives," says NCCJ Executive Director Dr.
It is obvious why we wanted her on the board and the value she can provide to us and the community," said Bart Charlow, executive director of NCCJ Silicon Valley.
Participants include PeaceBuilders, NCCJ, Miller Family Health Education Center, Long Beach Police and Fire Departments and Washington's Parents With a Purpose.
More than 3,500 students from the East Side Union High School District's 11 schools -- representing most of greater San Jose -- are expected to participate, according to Bart Charlow, Executive Director, NCCJ Silicon Valley.
Ted was also a member of the Worcester County Ethnic Affairs and he received the NCCJ Brotherhood Award in 1984 for outstanding leadership in furthering the ideals of a democratic society.
But, should the NCCJ retain its exclusive focus on religious tolerance?
As Schultz documents, the NCCJ was more than a "wary collaboration" among Protestants, Catholics, and Jews.