PPVT

(redirected from Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test)
Also found in: Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
PPVTPeabody Picture Vocabulary Test
PPVTPusat Perlindungan Varietas Tanaman (Indonesian: Plant Variety Protection Office)
References in periodicals archive ?
Desenvolvimento linguistico da crianca dos dois aos seis anos: Traducao e estandardizacao do Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test de Dunn & Dunn, e da Language Development Survey de Rescorla [Child's language development from two to six years: Translation and standardization of the Dunn & Dunn Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and Rescorla's Language Development Survey].
Standardized Receptive Vocabulary Test: Picture Vocabulary Test in Spanish (Adapted from the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test.
Participants were assessed using the third edition of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III) Form IIIA, a psychometric test that was developed and standardised on a representative U.
The first assessment, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), Form III-A (Dunn & Dunn, 1997) was administered in English and in Mandarin, as translated by his bilingual ELL tutor.
However, a secondary preplanned regression analysis uncovered a statistically significant positive association between levels of DHA in the blood and higher scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT).
Verbal IQ, as measured by the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, was negatively associated with measures of episodes of apnea and hypopnea (events in which breathing is restricted but does not stop completely).
Forty-nine 3- to 5-year-old African American children enrolled in Head Start were assessed using the third edition of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (Dunn & Dunn, 1997).
5 or greater on the hyperactivity index of the Revised Conners Teacher Rating Scale and Parent Rating Scale, have no additional psychiatric diagnosis, symptoms not attributable to another medical cause, score above 80 on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and receive no medication 20 hours prior to the testing.
Tabors of Harvard University, found that three- and four-year-olds whose family members expose them to "rare" words during mealtimes score higher on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) at age five than those who do not receive the same level of exposure.
A court-appointed psychologist also had Anne take a Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, in which she selected from a set of four pictures the one that illustrated the meaning of the word said by the examiner.