PLATO


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to PLATO: Aristotle, Socrates
AcronymDefinition
PLATOProgrammed Logic for Automated Teaching Operations
PLATOProject for Learning Abroad, Training and Outreach (Loyola Marymount University)
PLATOParticipatory Learning and Teaching Organization (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
PLATOPredictive Latency-Aware Total Ordering
PLATOPermanent Large Array of Terrestrial Observatories
PLATOPlatform for Learning and Teaching Online (online course management)
References in classic literature ?
The same recollection of his master may have been present to the mind of Plato when depicting the sufferings of the Just in the Republic.
Few persons will be found to wish that Socrates should have defended himself otherwise,'--if, as we must add, his defence was that with which Plato has provided him.
The personification of the Laws, and of their brethren the Laws in the world below, is one of the noblest and boldest figures of speech which occur in Plato.
There was Plato, too," continued his Majesty, modestly declining the snuff-box and the compliment it implied - "there was Plato, too, for whom I, at one time, felt all the affection of a friend.
His criticism of Plato in the light of history, in Book II.
I will not now consider how much this makes the charm of algebra and the mathematics, which also have their tropes, but it is felt in every definition; as when Aristotle defines space to be an immovable vessel in which things are contained; --or when Plato defines a line to be a flowing point; or figure to be a bound of solid; and many the like.
To the doctrine that virtue is knowledge, Plato has been constantly tending in the previous Dialogues.
We may judge from the noble commencement of the Timaeus, from the fragment of the Critias itself, and from the third book of the Laws, in what manner Plato would have treated this high argument.
What Plato has thought, he may think; what a saint has felt, he may feel; what at any time has befallen any man, he can understand.
This honest purpose you have been pleased to think I have attained: and to say the truth, it is likeliest to be attained in books of this kind; for an example is a kind of picture, in which virtue becomes, as it were, an object of sight, and strikes us with an idea of that loveliness, which Plato asserts there is in her naked charms.
Take such a proposition as "Socrates precedes Plato.
both the sorts of love, which you remember Plato defines in his Banquet, served as the test of men.