RHIE

(redirected from RAND Health Insurance Experiment)
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AcronymDefinition
RHIERegional Health Information Exchange (Keystone Health Information Exchange; Danville, PA)
RHIERand Health Insurance Experiment
References in periodicals archive ?
Over 40 years ago, the RAND Health Insurance Experiment provided strong evidence related to the effects associated with cost-sharing on healthcare utilization.
much of it compiled in the Rand Health Insurance Experiment (HIE), that
Gruber, "The Role of Consumer Copayments for Health Care: Lessons from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment and Beyond," forthcoming from the Kaiser Family Foundation, 2006.
Using data from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Siu et al.
Use of Medical Care in the Rand Health Insurance Experiment Diagnosis- and Service-Specific Analyses in a Randomized Controlled Trial, Medical Care.
Prospective social experiments are difficult and costly to conduct, but the studies that have been conducted, such as the Rand health insurance experiment, have yielded vast amounts of important information.
The HMO "expenditures" used in this analysis were constructed in connection with the Rand Health Insurance Experiment (see the discussion of the data, below) by taking each service performed for HMO patients and pricing it at a comparable FFS rate prevailing in the same community at the same time.
The landmark RAND Health Insurance Experiment (HIE) conducted in the late 1970s randomized families to different health insurance plans that varied in their cost-sharing (Leibowitz et al.
In this regard, findings from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (HIE) conducted during the 1970s may be instructive (Newhouse et al.
In the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (the only randomized controlled trial comparing high-deductible plans to comprehensive coverage), high deductibles caused a 17 percent fall in toddler immunizations and swelled the number of children failing to see a doctor in the course of a year from 15 percent to 32 percent among school-aged children and from 5 percent to 18 percent among infants and toddlers.