SERIES


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AcronymDefinition
SERIESSubarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment Study (various organizations)
SERIESSatellite Emission Range Infrared Earth Survey (NASA)
References in classic literature ?
The other alternative," said the Earl, "would be a diminuendo series of repetitions of the same type.
The variation from this plan produced a series of cross purposes, disastrous to the establishment, and detained Mr.
because of a series of large pillars which sustained the three stories.
Above, and circling the courtyard, was a series of open balconies.
About the court, from the ground to the top of the temple, were series of open galleries, and now and then the captive caught glimpses of bright eyes gleaming from beneath masses of tumbling hair, peering down upon him from above.
I date my first serious determination to throw over the medical profession at the earliest convenient opportunity, from the second season's series of dinners at which my aspirations, as a rising physician, unavoidably and regularly condemned me to be present.
As the fashion was, he wrote to her a series of sonnets, in one of which we learn that her name was Elizabeth.
Next, after the Fable of the Hawk and Nightingale, which serves as a condemnation of violence and injustice, the poet passes on to contrast the blessing which Righteousness brings to a nation, and the punishment which Heaven sends down upon the violent, and the section concludes with a series of precepts on industry and prudent conduct generally.
Granting that the question at present was simply that of sending a projectile up to the moon, every one must see that that involved the commencement of a series of experiments.
At one end of a short series we have humble-bees, which use their old cocoons to hold honey, sometimes adding to them short tubes of wax, and likewise making separate and very irregular rounded cells of wax.
The short biographies of many of the chief English authors in the English Men of Letters Series (Macmillan, 30 and 75 cents a volume) are generally admirable.
Though we have properly enough entitled this our work, a history, and not a life; nor an apology for a life, as is more in fashion; yet we intend in it rather to pursue the method of those writers, who profess to disclose the revolutions of countries, than to imitate the painful and voluminous historian, who, to preserve the regularity of his series, thinks himself obliged to fill up as much paper with the detail of months and years in which nothing remarkable happened, as he employs upon those notable aeras when the greatest scenes have been transacted on the human stage.