SPEEDI

AcronymDefinition
SPEEDISystem for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, TEPCO employees did not practice simulated site blackout disaster scenarios previous to the disaster event (ANS, 2012), and were inadequately trained in the SPEEDI evacuation forecasting system (National Diet of Japan, 2012).
AS the SPEEDI system was not available in the absence of nuclear reactor data in the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident, the NRA plans to adopt real radiation data as the new standards for evacuation orders.
The Japanese ministry decided that the SPEEDI data should not be released but that "more general" information could be prepared for the public.
Besides, the prediction of radioactive clouds by SPEEDI based on weather forecasts was never delivered to local municipalities and residents to help the evacuation, while only quick evacuations were instructed by the head of the NERHs.
However, the NSC has never delivered any information for helping the evacuation, ignoring the results of SPEEDI.
The government has been criticized for not being able to put the SPEEDI data to faster use after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami triggered the nuclear crisis.
In a dispatch from Fukushima in Japan, the report said that ''a culture that sought to avoid responsibility and, above all, criticism'' among bureaucrats in Tokyo was behind the delay in publicizing the forecasts from a government computer system designed to predict the spread of radioactive releases, known as the System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information, or SPEEDI.
It says that the government should have disclosed data based on SPEEDI (System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) - which predicts the distribution of radioactive substances released by a nuclear accident - immediately after the Fukushima accidents happened.
Although the government came under fire for not releasing sooner a forecast using its SPEEDI emergency estimate system for the impact of radiation in areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the draft report to the International Atomic Energy Agency says estimates are ''made public in sequence,'' according to the gist obtained by Kyodo News.
The malfunction of the Emergency Response Support System, or ERSS, coupled with the insufficiency of the System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information, or SPEEDI, designed to predict the dispersal of radioactive materials based on forecasts by ERSS, is likely to have delayed the effective evacuation of residents in Fukushima Prefecture.
The Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) has so far disclosed only two radiation level maps made by SPEEDI, or Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information, a computer simulation program that determines or predicts dispersions of radioactive substances released by a nuclear accident based on a division of the nation into geographic grids of 250 by 250 meters each - this despite the fact that the NSC made more than 2,000 maps based on trial calculations.
The simulation was conducted using the Nuclear Safety Technology Center's networked computer system, called the System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information, known as SPEEDI.