STATES


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Related to STATES: status
AcronymDefinition
STATESState Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System (United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
References in classic literature ?
No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen.
The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.
The Senate shall choose their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice-President, or when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United States.
The public debt of the Union would be a further cause of collision between the separate States or confederacies.
Still there is great room to suppose that the rule agreed upon would, upon experiment, be found to bear harder upon some States than upon others.
Laws in violation of private contracts, as they amount to aggressions on the rights of those States whose citizens are injured by them, may be considered as another probable source of hostility.
In the ideal state power will be given to the man with most knowledge of the good; in other states to the men who are most truly capable of achieving that end which the citizens have set themselves to pursue.
The Greeks with their small states had a far clearer apprehension than we can have of the dependence of a constitution upon the people who have to work it.
It must result from the UNANIMOUS assent of the several States that are parties to it, differing no otherwise from their ordinary assent than in its being expressed, not by the legislative authority, but by that of the people themselves.
The immediate election of the President is to be made by the States in their political characters.
Because such violences are more frequently caused by the passions and interests of a part than of the whole; of one or two States than of the Union.
The neighborhood of Spanish and British territories, bordering on some States and not on others, naturally confines the causes of quarrel more immediately to the borderers.