THICK


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AcronymDefinition
THICKThicket (Canada Post road designation)
References in classic literature ?
I did not confine my lodging to it, but often reposed in thick cane-brakes, to avoid the savages, who, I believe, often visited my camp, but fortunately for me, in my absence.
Away, then, they dashed through thick and thin; stones flying and sparks flashing at every bound.
Then we hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the thick willows.
WHEN they had gone a little way through the thick forest they came to a wide, clear space; and they saw the King's palace which was made of mud.
I walked along beside the surf with great enjoyment, till, thinking I was now got far enough to the south, I took the cover of some thick bushes and crept warily up to the ridge of the spit.
For, if the town intended to be destroyed should have in it any tall rocks, as it generally falls out in the larger cities, a situation probably chosen at first with a view to prevent such a catastrophe; or if it abound in high spires, or pillars of stone, a sudden fall might endanger the bottom or under surface of the island, which, although it consist, as I have said, of one entire adamant, two hundred yards thick, might happen to crack by too great a shock, or burst by approaching too near the fires from the houses below, as the backs, both of iron and stone, will often do in our chimneys.
He set it in front of him, and whilst he was looking at it attentively, such a thick smoke came out that he had to step back a pace or two.
The only thing that was different was the snow, which had lain thick upon the hills and trees when he started, but grew less and less the farther he went south, till it disappeared altogether.
In one part seeing people on the other side, and remarking that the water was shallow, and that the rocks and trees which grew very thick there contributed to facilitate the attempt, I leaped from one rock to another, till I reached the opposite bank, to the great amazement of the natives themselves, who never had tried that way; my four companions followed me with the same success: and it hath been called since the passage of Father Jerome.
The first objection is, that a Flatlander, seeing a Line, sees something that must be THICK to the eye as well as LONG to the eye (otherwise it would not be visible, if it had not some thickness); and consequently he ought (it is argued) to acknowledge that his countrymen are not only long and broad, but also (though doubtless in a very slight degree) THICK or HIGH.
The mist was spreading, and was now close up to the house, so that I could see it lying thick against the wall, as though it were stealing up to the windows.
The first is not less than two inches and a half thick and weighs 394 tons.