TON


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
AcronymDefinition
TONTonga (ISO Country code)
TONType O Negative
TONTransactions on Networking (IEE/ACM)
TONType Of Number
TONTurnover Number
TONTransparent Optical Node
TONTotal Outdoor Network (Bismarck, ND)
References in classic literature ?
But Mademoiselle Hennequin was a person of such perfect bon ton, had so thoroughly the manners of a lady, and was generally reputed so accomplished, that most of the friends of the family felt themselves bound to notice her.
Then declare yourself bankrupt at once, for this liability is a ton weight at least.
If you'd ever seen four hundred ton o' iron set into the -"
The 'Byzantine Empress' was already there, hung on the end wall - full length, gold frame weighing half a ton.
Setting aside a certain dapperness of carriage, which may be termed deskism for want of a better word, the manner of these persons seemed to me an exact fac-simile of what had been the perfection of bon ton about twelve or eighteen months before.
He grew the finest crop of wheat for miles around; in the season which brought others a yield of fifteen or twenty bushels to the acre, Martin averaged thirty-three, without buying a ton of commercial fertilizer.
The Rodman Columbiad threw a shot weighing half a ton a distance of six miles, with a velocity of 800 yards per second-- a result which Armstrong and Palisser have never obtained in England.
The elephant actress, as I was informed, weighed one ton less; so that we may take five as the average of a full-grown elephant.
But the main fact is that it is made of solid gold, and may weigh anywhere from one to two tons.
And all the while the thick-lipped leviathan is rushing through the deep, leaving tons of tumultuous white curds in his wake, and causing the slight boat to rock in the swells like a skiff caught nigh the paddle-wheels of an ocean steamer.
I had not been at home above ten days, when Captain William Robinson, a Cornish man, commander of the Hopewell, a stout ship of three hundred tons, came to my house.
Its area measures 6,032 feet; and its contents about 1,500 cubic yards; that is to say, when completely immersed it displaces 50,000 feet of water, or weighs 1,500 tons.