APLE

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Related to appellee: writ of certiorari
AcronymDefinition
APLEAssumption Program of Loans for Education (teacher incentive program; California)
APLEAction Pour Les Enfants (French: Action For Children; human rights organization; Cambodia)
APLEAppellee
APLEAverage Power Laser Experiment
APLEAssociation of Public Lighting Engineers (UK)
APLEAssessment of Prior Learning Experience (Daytona State College; Daytona Beach, Florida)
References in periodicals archive ?
Rule of Appellate Procedure 31(c) provides only that an appellee who
272) Following this discussion, the Court concluded: "In sum, appellees have alleged no injury to themselves as individuals (contra, Powell), the institutional injury they allege is wholly abstract and widely dispersed (contra, Coleman), and their attempt to litigate this dispute at this time and in this form is contrary to historical experience.
In each appeal, the issue is whether the appellee established its standing as a real party in interest to pursue the requested relief.
While the appellant generally has more convincing to do, the appellee just needs to answer any questions the court has and respond to anything outrageous the appellant said that was not in its brief.
Brief in Behalf of Appellee, The Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary at App.
An appellee confronting de novo review should not rely exclusively on the trial court's reasoning.
chastising the district court and appellee for "pay[ing] no heed to any of the other authorities contrary to their position, such as the decisions of the United States Supreme Court and the learned works of civil- and common-law scholars").
Hugg previously served as an Assistant District Attorney in the Appeals Unit of the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, where he prosecuted more than 130 matters, both as appellee and appellant, before the Pennsylvania Supreme and Superior Courts.
As a result of this doctrine, the appellee on appeal may argue a basis for affirmance even if not presented and argued in the trial court.