PERI-

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Related to around: get around
AcronymDefinition
PERI-Around (Prefix)
References in classic literature ?
So he kept on tramping up and down the floor and muttering, till by and by he begun to look pretty tired; then Benny she went and snuggled up to his side and put one hand in his and one arm around his waist and walked with him; and he smiled down on her, and reached down and kissed her; and so, little by little the trouble went out of his face and she persuaded him off to his room.
but I mean you'd just see 'em -- scattered around, you know, in a kind of a general way.
Then we can come back into Oakland from the other side, sneak across on the ferry, and send the machine back around to-night with the chauffeur.
Five or six of the fishermen had gathered around him.
The Bonanza king of the Black Forest lives to a good old age, blessed with the love of his wife and of his twenty-seven children, and the still sweeter envy of everybody around.
He wore his hair long like in pictures, and had a silk sash around his waist he'd learned to wear in California from the Spanish, and two revolvers in his belt.
Oz was not such a bad Wizard, after all," said the Tin Woodman, as he felt his heart rattling around in his breast.
The Wizard added to the entertainment by making a big pie appear before Dorothy, and when the little girl cut the pie the nine tiny piglets leaped out of it and danced around the table, while the orchestra played a merry tune.
Thus do I show them only the ice and winter of my peaks--and NOT that my mountain windeth all the solar girdles around it!
Of course, if you make a howling mistake," Collins told them, "that's when you all pull the wires like mad and poke the leader and whirl him around.
When the waves began to tumble and toss and to grow bigger and bigger the ship rolled up and down, and tipped sidewise--first one way and then the other--and was jostled around so roughly that even the sailor-men had to hold fast to the ropes and railings to keep themselves from being swept away by the wind or pitched headlong into the sea.
Who saw thee on that bridal day, When that deep blush would come o'er thee, Though happiness around thee lay, The world all love before thee.