C

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AcronymDefinition
CCopyright (usually written ©)
C100 (Roman numeral)
CAverage grade
CCell (phone; science)
CTransport (US military aircraft designation for transport aircraft since 1962)
CBattery Size
CCelsius/Centigrade
csymbol for the speed of light (in a vacuum, 299,792,458 meters per second)
CClick
CCum (Latin: With, often seen with a bar over the c)
CSee
CCompany
CControl
CCenter (basketball)
CCenter (football)
CComplete
CCurrent (action code)
CCollege
CCase
CCost
CCategory (abstract algebra)
CColor
CClose
CClear
CClub (class airfare)
CChicago
CCommon
CIndividual (IRB)
CSea
CCorrect
CCanadian
CCentury
CC Programming Language
CCombined (DoD)
CCorporate
CCentre (Canada Post road designation)
CClubs (playing cards)
CCookie
CCable
CCorporation
CCharacter
CCaught
CCup
CChief
CCommittee
CChapter
CCompliance (Network World)
CChemical
CCharlotte, NC (mint mark on coinage 1837-1861)
CCharlie
CEconomy Class (Air Freight)
CAir Post (philatelic catalog prefix for non-ground stamps)
CCorner (welded joint type)
CConnect (ITU-T)
CCycle
CCastle
CConstant
CPrince Edward Island (Canada Post designation)
CConfidential
CCircuit
CCatholic
CChairman
CCent
CCongress
CCollector (transistor; electronics)
CCarbon
CCandle
CCalm
CCombinations (probability)
CConsumption (economics)
CCliff (Stores 100 code)
CCirca
CConservative
CCommonwealth
CContainer (SDH)
CCloudy
CColon (currency of Costa Rica and El Salvador)
CCork (Irish car registration)
CCairo (Egyptian automobile license plate)
CCubic
CCodex
CCalorie
CCompute(r)
CCough
CCarat
CCatcher (baseball)
CConduit
CCocaine
CCanceled
CCyan
CAffirmative (logging abbreviation)
CClerical (for ACG duties)
CClock Mode (aviation)
CCircumference
CCountess
CCoefficient
CCessna (civilian aircraft)
CCorrelations
CChromosome (as in banding)
CCurie
CClockwise
CConstant of Integration (calculus)
CCarbone (French: Carbon)
CComptroller
CConsonant (speech)
CCitigroup (stock symbol)
CCitiGroup, Inc. (NYSE symbol)
CAscorbic Acid (vitamin)
CCoverage factor
CConseco
CCircling (approach and landing charts)
CC Major (music)
CCapacitance
CExposure Concentration (environment)
CCentimeter
CCranial Nerve
CCysteine (amino acid)
CCedi (currency of Ghana)
CCourt of Chancery (UK)
CSet of Complex Numbers (mathematics)
CCoulomb
CCentavo
CCentime
CConvective
CCeiling Limit (weather reports)
CContralto
CCentum (relating to an Indo-European language pronunciation)
CCool Breeze (rapper)
CCenti (abbreviation of abbreviation for 1/100)
CCentral Standard Time (as used in time groups)
CCytosine
cCenterpartiet (Swedish political party)
CCaesarian
CNicaraguan Cordoba (national currency)
CCervical Vertebra (prefix, as in C-1, C-2)
CCycloplegic
CCongius (Latin: Colt)
CC Programming Language Source Code (file name extension)
CFresnel Cosine Integral
CFederal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (designates original point of circulation of a dollar bill)
Ccreeping line pattern (US DoD)
CMusical pitch/note
CUndenominated US Stamp (20 cents, introduced 1 Nov 1981)
References in classic literature ?
He attacks education, he boasts of the fanaticism of the twelfth century, he makes absurd grimaces, and added to that he is by no means the innocent he makes himself out to be.
The tragic circumstance which strengthened and consecrated their natural community of interest had, one might think, something to do with the far-reaching pensiveness even of their most humorous writing, touching often the deepest springs of pity and awe, as the way of the highest humour is--a way, however, very different from that of the humorists of the eighteenth century.
Let its writers make time to write English more as a learned language; and completing that correction of style which had only gone a certain way in the last century, raise the general level of language towards their own.
Saintsbury's book--a writer who has dealt with all the perturbing influences of our century in a manner as classical, as idiomatic, as easy and elegant, as Steele's:
It was not until the twelfth century that paper began to be made in some parts of Europe, and it was not until the fifteenth century that paper books became common in England.
During this long period these fables seem to have suffered an eclipse, to have disappeared and to have been forgotten; and it is at the commencement of the fourteenth century, when the Byzantine emperors were the great patrons of learning, and amidst the splendors of an Asiatic court, that we next find honors paid to the name and memory of Aesop.
The greatest advance, however, towards a re-introduction of the Fables of Aesop to a place in the literature of the world, was made in the early part of the seventeenth century.
His name is mentioned by Avienus; by Suidas, a celebrated critic, at the close of the eleventh century, who gives in his lexicon several isolated verses of his version of the fables; and by John Tzetzes, a grammarian and poet of Constantinople, who lived during the latter half of the twelfth century.
Their letters and disputations on this subject, enlivened on both sides with much wit and learning, will ever bear a conspicuous place in the literary history of the seventeenth century.
One age followed another until the first years of the eighteenth Christian century saw the reign of Aurungzebe, Emperor of the Moguls.
Time rolled on from the first to the last years of the eighteenth Christian century.
The Place de Greve is especially noteworthy for its history of contentiousness in the nineteenth century, for it was here that crowds tended to gather, rumors of insurrection circulated and rebellions reached their climax; where the heightened social tensions that marked Paris from the Revolution of 1789 though the Commune of 1871 could be seen to take shape and play out.