CHTR

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AcronymDefinition
CHTRCharter
CHTRCompact High Temperature Reactor (atomic energy)
CHTRCircle of Hope Therapeutic Riding, Inc. (Barnesville, MD)
CHTRCentre for Hospitality and Tourism Research (Victoria University; Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)
CHTRCollection, Handling, Transport and Release (California)
CHTRCanadian High Temperature Research
References in classic literature ?
While you looked so, I should be certain that whatever charter you might grant under coercion, your first act, when released, would be to violate its conditions.
They were the productions of different minds and of adverse passions; one, ascending for the foundation of human government to the laws of nature and of God, written upon the heart of man; the other, resting upon the basis of human institutions, and prescriptive law, and colonial charter.
His predecessor under the old charter, Bradstreet, a venerable companion of the first settlers, was known to be in town.
Several gentlemen among them purchased a tract of country on the coast of Massachusetts Bay, and obtained a charter from King Charles, which authorized them to make laws for the settlers.
For a short time after the charter of the regents was received, the trustees of this institution employed a graduate of one of the Eastern colleges to instruct such youth as aspired to knowledge within the walls of the edifice which we have described.
Thus countenanced, however, he obtained, in 1809, a charter from the legislature of the State of New York, incorporating a company under the name of "The American Fur Company," with a capital of one million of dollars, with the privilege of increasing it to two millions.
To set a large group of people in motion and transport them to a distance, to have special conveyances, to charter railway-carriages and steamboats, harmonized with his relish for bold processes, and made hospitality seem more active and more to the purpose.
There is an old charter which puts the matter naively: apropos of fidelity:
Some years before a Royal Charter had been obtained, and the profession was becoming every year more respectable, lucrative, and important.
We shall go on together to the nearest settlement, and there we will charter a boat and sail back down the coast for the treasure and so transport it easily.
Over the rapids, where in after years trim Bell Weir lock will stand, they have been forced or dragged by their sturdy rowers, and now are crowding up as near as they dare come to the great covered barges, which lie in readiness to bear King John to where the fateful Charter waits his signing.
Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive.