CNTN

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AcronymDefinition
CNTNContain
CNTNCalifornia NeuroAIDS Tissue Network (University of California)
References in classic literature ?
Therefore what he gives (Whose praise be ever sung) to man in part Spiritual, may of purest Spirits be found No ingrateful food: and food alike those pure Intelligential substances require As doth your Rational; and both contain Within them every lower facultie Of sense, whereby they hear, see, smell, touch, taste, Tasting concoct, digest, assimilate, And corporeal to incorporeal turn.
These bags contain the ransom of four good horses, and four good suits of armour.
In the meantime Miss Wilson, unable to contain her annoyance at Agatha's extravagance, spoke of it to the girls who shared the coach with her.
Little had been left besides the framework of the house, but in one corner there was a stone slab laid down by way of hearth and an old rusty iron basket to contain the fire.
Some time after, asking a friend at court how they came to fix on that determinate number, he told me that his majesty's mathematicians, having taken the height of my body by the help of a quadrant, and finding it to exceed theirs in the proportion of twelve to one, they concluded from the similarity of their bodies, that mine must contain at least 1724 of theirs, and consequently would require as much food as was necessary to support that number of Lilliputians.
And, indeed, the whole book seemed to him to contain the story of his own life, written before he had lived it.
She seemed suddenly almost unable to contain an overpowering gaiety.
But the truth is, that both of them contain all which, in relation to their objects, is reasonably to be desired.
Clouds, rain, storms, and humors-- does the life of man contain aught but these?
Accordingly, whether emotions are caused by changes in the viscera or by sensible objects, they contain elements which are sensations according to our definition.
The two or three lines which follow contain fragments of words only, mingled with blots and scratches of the pen.
In sum, gentlemen, what the wildness of this canal life is, is emphatically evinced by this; that our wild whale-fishery contains so many of its most finished graduates, and that scarce any race of mankind, except Sydney men, are so much distrusted by our whaling captains.