DIC

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AcronymDefinition
DICDifferential Interference Contrast
DICDictionary (File Name Extension)
DICDubai Internet City
DICDissolved Inorganic Carbon
DICDisseminated Intravascular Coagulation
DICDriver Information Center
DICDeposit Insurance Corporation (various countries)
DICDependency & Indemnity Compensation
DICDifference in Conditions (insurance)
DICDrug Information Center (various universities)
DICDubai International Capital Llc
DICDrop-in-Center
DICDainippon Ink and Chemicals, Inc.
DICDirector in Charge
DICDiploma of Imperial College (London UK)
DICDrop in Centre
DICDistrict Industries Center (India)
DICDo I Care?
DICDiisopropylcarbodiimide
DICDocument Identifier Code
DICDeath Is Coming
DICDrunk in Charge
DICDied in Captivity
DICDepartment of Immigration and Citizenship (Australia)
DICDriver Improvement Course
DICDirección de Investigación Criminal (Criminal Investigation Division, Honduras)
DICDiagnostic Imaging Center
DICDefense Intelligence College
DICData Integrity Check
DICDream in Code (website)
DICDépartement d'Information et de Communication (French)
DICDiffusion, Information et Communication (French)
DICDairy Industry Committee (USA)
DICDeputy in Charge
DICData Insertion Converter
DICDisseminated Intravascular Clot (pathology)
DICDirect Interference Contrast
DICDefense Industrial Cooperation
DICDigital Input Channel
DICDedicated Internet Consultancy
DICData Input Check
DICDeputy Installation Commander
DICDirect Image Copy
DICDirect Indicating Compass
DICData Input Console
DICDigital Input Computer
DICDowntown Intermodal Center
DICDanového Identifikacního Císla (Czech: Identification Number of Payer of Value Added Tax)
DICDéshydratation Intracellulaire (French: Intracellular Dehydration)
DICDroit a l'Image Collective (French: Right to Collective Image; intellectual property)
DICDisponibilité, Intégrité, Confidentialité (French: Availability, Integrity, Confidentiality)
DICDumas Isolation Cloisons (French: Dumas Isolation Partitions)
DICDubai Industrial City (United Arab Emirates)
DICDeterministic Interference Channel
DICDépannage Installation Conseil (French: Troubleshooting Installation Council)
DICDipartimento di Ingegneria Civile (Italian: Department of Civil Engineering)
DICDétente Instantanée Contrôlée (French: Controlled Instantaneous Relaxation)
References in classic literature ?
At the time Chesterfield, not foreseeing the importance of the work, was coldly indifferent, but shortly before the Dictionary appeared, being better informed, he attempted to gain a share in the credit by commending it in a periodical.
In his Dictionary Johnson had contemptuously defined a pension thus: 'An allowance made to any one without an equivalent.
Their old father gave each of them a fine horse; the one who knew the dictionary and the daily paper by heart had a black horse, while the other who was so clever at corporation law had a milk- white one.
At last she came to the row in which the brother who knew the dictionary by heart was, but he did not know it any longer; he had quite forgotten it in the rank and file.
Last Sunday when I found seraphim in the dictionary I was ashamed I had made it serrafim but seraphim is not a word you can guess at like another long one outlandish in this letter which spells itself.
You can begin with SCHLAG-ADER, which means artery, and you can hang on the whole dictionary, word by word, clear through the alphabet to SCHLAG-WASSER, which means bilge-water--and including SCHLAG-MUTTER, which means mother-in-law.
So he resorts to the dictionary for help, but there is no help there.
His education progressed; but his greatest finds were in the inexhaustible storehouse of the huge illustrated dictionary, for he learned more through the medium of pictures than text, even after he had grasped the significance of the bugs.
With the help of the great dictionary and the active intelligence of a healthy mind endowed by inheritance with more than ordinary reasoning powers he shrewdly guessed at much which he could not really understand, and more often than not his guesses were close to the mark of truth.
Martin then proceeded to write down eight lines in English, of the most matter-of-fact kind, the first that came into his head; and to convert these, line by line, by main force of Gradus and dictionary into Latin that would scan.
After he had been through the grammar repeatedly, he took up the dictionary and added twenty words a day to his vocabulary.
I considered the dictionary man's unconscious testimony suggestive and worth something in the discussion.