C2H5OH

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Related to ethanol: Ethanol fuel, Ethanol fermentation
AcronymDefinition
C2H5OHEthanol
References in periodicals archive ?
Current ethanol production is estimated at about 2.
Department of Agriculture, claims that the net energy content of ethanol runs 1.
We believe President Bush's visit to Novozymes sends the world a strong message about the importance of the work that industrial biotechnology companies are doing to provide a key enabling technology for large-scale production of ethanol," said Jim Greenwood, president and CEO of BIO.
The company, through its wholly-owned ethanol marketing arm, Kinergy Marketing, intends to continue serving its ethanol customers with production from other Pacific Ethanol plants and Kinergy suppliers.
Researchers at Dedini Industrias de Base, which normally builds sugar-ethanol plants and makes replacement parts for industry--for nearly two decades believed they could make much better use of bagasse by recycling it into ethanol rather than on-the-spot electricity.
The ethanol source of the future, some experts say, is not the corn kernel but the stover--the stalk, cob and other portions of the plant that are currently fed to livestock, burned or left lying on the field--as well as wheat residue, rice straw and fast-growing "energy crops" such as switchgrass or poplar trees.
Comprehensive data showing ethanol capacities, production, consumption, trade statistics, and prices in the recent years are provided (globally, regionally and by country)
At one point in time, ethanol was not part of the answer to our fuel situation (remember gasohol?
Corn Belt states, ethanol distilleries are taking over the corn supply.
Brazilian private companies are busy investing billions in the construction of some 50 new ethanol production plants.
While ethanol provides 25 percent more energy than it consumes, the energy gain for soybean biodiesel is 93 percent.
Supporters say that when blended with petroleum products, ethanol from switchgrass results in a net energy gain of 334 percent, compared to just 21 percent for corn-based ethanol.