HX

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AcronymDefinition
HXHalifax (postcode, United Kingdom)
HXHotline X
HXHercules & Xena: Alliance of Heroes (game)
HXHalf Duplex
HXHeat Exchanger
HXHistory
HXHandling Instructions (Radio traffic handling)
HXHydrogen Exchange
References in classic literature ?
The settling of this region well deserves a place in history.
On the triangular portion of the gable, that fronted next the street, was a dial, put up that very morning, and on which the sun was still marking the passage of the first bright hour in a history that was not destined to be all so bright.
The remainder may perhaps be applied to purposes equally valuable hereafter, or not impossibly may be worked up, so far as they go, into a regular history of Salem, should my veneration for the natal soil ever impel me to so pious a task.
As to the books and furniture of the schoolhouse, they belonged to the community, excepting Cotton Mather's History of Witchcraft, a New England Almanac, and book of dreams and fortune-telling; in which last was a sheet of foolscap much scribbled and blotted in several fruitless attempts to make a copy of verses in honor of the heiress of Van Tassel.
I remember feeling with Miles in especial as if he had had, as it were, no history.
In the First Part of this history we left the valiant Biscayan and the renowned Don Quixote with drawn swords uplifted, ready to deliver two such furious slashing blows that if they had fallen full and fair they would at least have split and cleft them asunder from top to toe and laid them open like a pomegranate; and at this so critical point the delightful history came to a stop and stood cut short without any intimation from the author where what was missing was to be found.
Poetry, therefore, is a more philosophical and a higher thing than history: for poetry tends to express the universal, history the particular.
History alone would not have immortalized his memory.
He had no difficulty in relating them; for it really seemed as if every person noted in our early history had, on some occasion or other, found repose within its comfortable arms.
That is all; but its history contains the histories of all the others--in fact, the whole history of early England.
The more we try to explain such events in history reasonably, the more unreasonable and incomprehensible do they become to us.
I gave my heart simply and passionately to the author who made the scenes of that most pathetic history live in my sympathy, and companioned me with the stately and gracious actors in them.
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