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Related to knowledge: general knowledge
AcronymDefinition
KKing (playing cards, chess)
KBlack (in CMYK color space)
KKindergarten (as in K-12)
KKelvin (thermodynamic temperature scale)
KKosher (symbol on food labels)
KKilo- (thousand)
KKalium (Potassium)
KOK/Okay
KSpecial K (cereal)
KOver (logging abbreviation)
KQue (Spanish)
KKnowledge
KContract
KKiller (type of white blood cell)
KOkay
KCapital (economics)
KK-Mart (store)
KCarrying Capacity (population studies)
KKerry (Irish car registration)
KCologne (auto license plate)
KKey Generator
KKnot
KKirby
KEastern Ontario (postal code designation, Canada)
KKompressor (band)
KKappa (receptor)
KKicker (football)
KKarat
KConductivity
KCurvature
KLysine (amino acid)
KPermeability (physics)
KCathode (electronics)
KKetamine (animal tranquilizer/disassociative)
KKilobyte
KStrikeout
KKorpus (Russian, building; used in postal addresses)
KKnit Stitch
KKerrang! (British Magazine and TV Channel)
KPhylloquinone (vitamin)
KK Language (Unix-Based programming language)
KKell Blood Group
KKey/Black (printing ink in CMYK model)
KBoltzman Constant
KCoefficient of Thermal Conductivity
KKilohm (unit of electrical resistance; also seen as Kiloohm)
KKiloohm (resistor; electronics schematics)
KLudwig von Köchel (publisher of catalog of the works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)
KKlebsiella Pneumoniae Serotype
KFederal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Texas (designates original point of circulation of a dollar bill)
KKeratometric Reading (contact lens fitting term)
KKellogg's Corp (stock symbol)
KConfidential Cryptographic (TMINS)
KUS Offices in China Stamp (Scott Catalogue prefix; philately)
KTanker Aircraft Designation (US military, as in KC-10)
KWreck Less Than $50 Damage (Alabama Public Safety radio code)
References in classic literature ?
Great joy he promis'd to his thoughts, and new Solace in her return, so long delay'd; Yet oft his heart, divine of somthing ill, Misgave him; hee the faultring measure felt; And forth to meet her went, the way she took That Morn when first they parted; by the Tree Of Knowledge he must pass, there he her met, Scarse from the Tree returning; in her hand A bough of fairest fruit that downie smil'd, New gatherd, and ambrosial smell diffus'd.
The long chains of simple and easy reasonings by means of which geometers are accustomed to reach the conclusions of their most difficult demonstrations, had led me to imagine that all things, to the knowledge of which man is competent, are mutually connected in the same way, and that there is nothing so far removed from us as to be beyond our reach, or so hidden that we cannot discover it, provided only we abstain from accepting the false for the true, and always preserve in our thoughts the order necessary for the deduction of one truth from another.
The knowledge relating to them must evidently be of a kind that will either be suggested by the nature of the article itself, or can easily be procured from any well-informed man, especially of the mercantile class.
And the increased intercourse among those of different States will contribute not a little to diffuse a mutual knowledge of their affairs, as this again will contribute to a general assimilation of their manners and laws.
But just as the force of gravitation, incomprehensible in itself but felt by every man, is understood by us only to the extent to which we know the laws of inevitability to which it is subject (from the first knowledge that all bodies have weight, up to Newton's law), so too the force of free will, incomprehensible in itself but of which everyone is conscious, is intelligible to us only in as far as we know the laws of inevitability to which it is subject (from the fact that every man dies, up to the knowledge of the most complex economic and historic laws).
But every year, as your knowledge grows, you will find that new keys have been put into your hands with which you may unlock the doors which are now closed.
He will assume that if virtue is knowledge, then virtue can be taught.
But no other Dialogue of Plato has the same largeness of view and the same perfection of style; no other shows an equal knowledge of the world, or contains more of those thoughts which are new as well as old, and not of one age only but of all.
This last requisite is what the dramatic critics call conversation of character; and it requires a very extraordinary degree of judgment, and a most exact knowledge of human nature.
The peculiar knowledge of the pilot and captain sufficed for many thousands of people who knew no more of the sea and navigation than I knew.
Power is it, this new virtue; a ruling thought is it, and around it a subtle soul: a golden sun, with the serpent of knowledge around it.
Our Knowledge of the External World" (Allen & Unwin), Chapters III and IV.
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