NAT

(redirected from natural)
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AcronymDefinition
NATNetwork Address Translation
NATNational
NATNatural
NATNucleic Acid Testing (blood test)
NATNational AIDS Trust
NATNews At Ten
NATNo Action Taken
NATNucleic Acid Amplification Testing
NATarylamine N-acetyltransferase
NATNorth Atlantic Region
NATNucleic Acid Amplification Technology
NATNice and Tight
NATNorthern Airborne Technology (Kelowna, BC Canada)
NATNoradrenaline Transporter
NATNitric Acid Trihydrate
NATNorth Atlantic Track
NATNational Air Transport
NATNeutralizing Antibody Titer
NATNon-Accidental Trauma (child abuse)
NATN-Terminal Acetyltransferase (biology)
NATNational Actors Theatre
NATNon-Aggression Treaty (gaming)
NATName Address Translation
NATNecessary Action Taken (law enforcement)
NATNatal, Rio Grande Do Norte, Brazil - Agusto Severo (Airport Code)
NATNational Account Team
NATNon-Atomic Term
NATNot Air Transportable
NATNovel Acting Thrombolytic (clot dissolver)
NATNose-Avoidance Tilting
NATNot A Trooper (medical slang)
NATNorth America Traffic
NATNetwork Aggregate Throughput
NATNuclear Assembly Test
NATNaval Afloat Targeting
NATNot Another Translator (Braille transcription software)
NATNode Allocation Table
NATNavy Acceptance Trials
NATNot Air Transportation
NATNonambulatory Tetraparesis (veterinary medicine)
NATNMCC (National Military Command Center) AMPS (Automated Message Processing System) Terminal (US Military Communications)
References in classic literature ?
We shall best understand the probable course of natural selection by taking the case of a country undergoing some physical change, for instance, of climate.
We have reason to believe, as stated in the first chapter, that a change in the conditions of life, by specially acting on the reproductive system, causes or increases variability; and in the foregoing case the conditions of life are supposed to have undergone a change, and this would manifestly be favourable to natural selection, by giving a better chance of profitable variations occurring; and unless profitable variations do occur, natural selection can do nothing.
As a child I had not been content with the results promised by the modern professors of natural science.
There only remained a resolution to return to my ancient studies and to devote myself to a science for which I believed myself to possess a natural talent.
Hence it is evident that a city is a natural production, and that man is naturally a political animal, and that whosoever is naturally and not accidentally unfit for society, must be either inferior or superior to man: thus the man in Homer, who is reviled for being "without society, without law, without family.
That sense of a life in natural objects, which in most poetry is but a rhetorical artifice, was, then, in Wordsworth the assertion of what was for him almost literal fact.
100] When he thought of men and women, it was of men and women as in the presence and under the influence of those effective natural objects, and linked to them by many associations.
These are not vague inferences drawn from supposed or speculative defects in a Constitution, the whole power of which is lodged in the hands of a people, or their representatives and delegates, but they are solid conclusions, drawn from the natural and necessary progress of human affairs.
Must not injustice be a strife which arises among the three principles-- a meddlesomeness, and interference, and rising up of a part of the soul against the whole, an assertion of unlawful authority, which is made by a rebellious subject against a true prince, of whom he is the natural vassal,--what is all this confusion and delusion but injustice, and intemperance and cowardice and ignorance, and every form of vice?
She explained that Charles's anger was natural, but mistaken.
But, of all recognitions, the best is that which arises from the incidents themselves, where the startling discovery is made by natural means.
This volume contains, in the form of a Journal, a history of our voyage, and a sketch of those observations in Natural History and Geology, which I think will possess some interest for the general reader.