OBJ

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Related to objective: Objective C
AcronymDefinition
OBJObject
OBJObjective
OBJOlusegun Obasanjo (president of Nigeria)
OBJOrlando Business Journal
OBJObject Marker (linguistics)
OBJQueryObject Systems Corporation (stock symbol)
OBJOffences Brought to Justice (UK; also seen as OBTJ)
OBJOcala Business Journal
OBJOfficial Black Jester (website)
OBJOn-Board Jammer
References in classic literature ?
A general does nothing but command the troops, indicates the objective, and hardly ever uses a weapon himself.
I feel a terror of action and am only at ease in the impersonal, disinterested, and objective line of thought.
At first his vast sorrow numbed his other faculties of thought--his brain was overwhelmed by the calamity to such an extent that it reacted to but a single objective suggestion: She is dead
Deprived of air it would die; but if only a sufficient amount of the gas was introduced to stupefy an ordinary creature it would have no effect upon the rykor, who had no objective mind to overcome.
In three seconds he would have to light the fuse and throw the sputtering stick with directed aim to its objective.
On the contrary - " Brissenden paused and ran an insolent eye over Martin's objective poverty, passing from the well-worn tie and the saw-edged collar to the shiny sleeves of the coat and on to the slight fray of one cuff, winding up and dwelling upon Martin's sunken cheeks.
It was after the course had been changed and all sail set, and after the Ancient Mariner had privily informed him that Taiohae, in the Marquesas, was their objective, that Daughtry gaily proceeded to shave.
China was the objective, that was all that was known.
He had already fixed his sharp eye upon the house which he reasoned should be his objective point, when he noticed a woman approaching rapidly from the opposite direction.
You also tried to release the objective case from its thraldom to the preposition, and it is written that servants should obey their masters.
These colors belonged really to the lunar disc, and did not result, as some astronomers say, either from the imperfection in the objective of the glasses or from the interposition of the terrestrial atmosphere.
What is the author's attitude toward Nature--(1) does he view Nature in a purely objective way, as a mass of material things, a series of material phenomena or a mere embodiment of sensuous beauty; or (2) is there symbolism or mysticism in his attitude, that is--does he view Nature with awe as a spiritual power; or (3) is he thoroughly subjective, reading his own moods into Nature or using Nature chiefly for the expression of his moods?