PATRON


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AcronymDefinition
PATRONPatrol Squadron
References in classic literature ?
My patron lying at home longer than usual without fitting out his ship, which, as I heard, was for want of money, he used constantly, once or twice a week, sometimes oftener if the weather was fair, to take the ship's pinnace and go out into the road a- fishing; and as he always took me and young Maresco with him to row the boat, we made him very merry, and I proved very dexterous in catching fish; insomuch that sometimes he would send me with a Moor, one of his kinsmen, and the youth - the Maresco, as they called him - to catch a dish of fish for him.
The same night, such a man of regularity was the patron of The Young Amelia, the profits were divided, and each man had a hundred Tuscan livres, or about eighty francs.
His patron followed him with his eyes, and when his back was turned, smiled as he had never done when he stood beside the mirror.
I think,' said Rokesmith, when they all stood about her, while she packed her tidy basket--except Bella, who was busily helping on her knees at the chair on which it stood; 'that at least you might keep a letter in your pocket, Mrs Higden, which I would write for you and date from here, merely stating, in the names of Mr and Mrs Boffin, that they are your friends;--I won't say patrons, because they wouldn't like it.
The patron had not quite vanished, the bookseller had not yet taken his place.
They must be in a hurry, for it is not the king," said the patron.
His patron took that opportunity of turning the key in the door, and then sat down upon his bed.
From the name of my patron, indeed, I hope my reader will be convinced, at his very entrance on this work, that he will find in the whole course of it nothing prejudicial to the cause of religion and virtue, nothing inconsistent with the strictest rules of decency, nor which can offend even the chastest eye in the perusal.
George, who is patron of us all," said the Sheriff vigorously, "that I will never disturb or distress the outlaws in Sherwood.
The young lady gathered her shawl about her like a perfect Parisienne, and it was with the smile of a Parisienne that she took leave of her patron.
Why,'' said the knight, ``did you not tell me that this water was from the well of your blessed patron, St Dunstan?
From her life's experience gathered in various "business houses" the good woman had taken into her retirement an ideal of gentlemanliness as exhibited by the patrons of private-saloon bars.