QS

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AcronymDefinition
QSQuality System
QSQuantity Surveyor
QSQuick Scope (Call of Duty)
QSQuick Start
QSQuality Standard (various companies)
QSQuicksilver
QSQualitätssicherung (German: Quality Assurance)
QSQuacquarelli Symonds (est. 1990)
QSQuality Service(s)
QSQuantified Self
QSQuébec Solidaire (Canada political party)
QSQuit Smoking
QSQuikSilver Inc (boarding company)
QSQuality Surveillance (US DoD)
QSQuorum Sensing
QSQuantity Supply
QSQuality Starts (baseball)
QSQuick Strike
QSQuick Shift (Campagnolo bicycle shifter)
QSQuality Start (baseball gaming)
QSQuality Start (baseball; start by a pitcher of 6+ innings & 3 runs or fewer)
QSQuantity Sufficient
QSQuartersawn (cutting lumber from logs to yield grain at approx 90* to face of board)
QSQuota Share
QSQuasi-Static
QSQuadratic Sieve (method of factoring integers)
QSQuasi-Synchronous
QSQualification Sample
QSQuantum Sufficit (Latin: as much as suffices)
QSQuantum Sufficiat (Latin: sufficient quantity; on a prescription, indicates quantity is left to the dispenser's discretion)
QSQuota Sample
QSQuickbooks Specialist
QSQuarter Session
QSQualitative State
QSQuality Scalability
QSQueen Scout (Australia)
QSQuarternary Structure
QSQuickStack
QSQueens Surface
QSQuébec Secours (Canada)
QSQuota Source
QSQuantity Spilled
QSBody Heat Storage Index
References in periodicals archive ?
A quota sample consisting of 150 face-to-face interviews representative of the 1990 census data for the Greater Tampa Bay Area was used for this study.
For example, if we know that a county contains 20 percent wheat farmers, 60 percent cotton farmers, and 20 percent livestock farmers, we can select a quota sample that contains exactly those same percentages.
Given the unequal distribution of male and female entrepreneurs in various business sectors in the UK the authors reject the notion of a comparison between randomly drawn samples of men and women in favour of a quota sample.
Peter Collett writes about 'British businessmen abroad', reporting a study of a quota sample of 634 Eurocommuters (including 16 females), captured in the departure lounges of Heathrow and Gatwick, to collect their experience (and stereotypes) of working in different countries.