TALENT


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AcronymDefinition
TALENTTraining Adult Literacy, English as a Second Language, and Numeracy Teachers (UK)
References in classic literature ?
There is not much danger that real talent or goodness will be overlooked long, even if it is, the consciousness of possessing and using it well should satisfy one, and the great charm of all power is modesty.
I knew a girl once, who had a really remarkable talent for music, and she didn't know it, never guessed what sweet little things she composed when she was alone, and wouldn't have believed it if anyone had told her.
I give you my word of honour, there's no one painting to-day in whose talent I am more convinced.
Campbell, I have no idea that you will suppose her talents can be unknown.
I shall certainly have her very often at my house, shall introduce her wherever I can, shall have musical parties to draw out her talents, and shall be constantly on the watch for an eligible situation.
Thus we find that ardent and vigorous genius, forced to rely on the independence of its own poverty, quits these cold regions where thought is persecuted by brutal indifference, where no woman is willing to be a sister of charity to a man of talent, of art, of science.
The defenders of religion can enter the lists against impiety without disadvantage at the present moment, for there is a great deal of talent in the royalist press.
I haven't any talent, or any especial taste that I can see, and that is why I can't decide, uncle.
No; I have n't the talent for managing people, but I see what ought to be done.
The lover has no talent, no skill, which passes for quite nothing with his enamoured maiden, however little she may possess of related faculty; and the heart which abandons itself to the Supreme Mind finds itself related to all its works, and will travel a royal road to particular knowledges and powers.
Yet, be it understood, I shall not limit my ambition to this - or even to producing 'a perfect work of art': time and talents so spent, I should consider wasted and misapplied.
They who wish to commit the power under consideration to a popular assembly, composed of members constantly coming and going in quick succession, seem not to recollect that such a body must necessarily be inadequate to the attainment of those great objects, which require to be steadily contemplated in all their relations and circumstances, and which can only be approached and achieved by measures which not only talents, but also exact information, and often much time, are necessary to concert and to execute.