TRANS

(redirected from translation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to translation: Wordreference
AcronymDefinition
TRANSTranslation
TRANSTransitive
TRANSTransport
TRANSTransvestite
TRANSTransportation
TRANSTransmission (telecommunications)
TRANSTransition
TRANSTransaction
TRANSTranslator
TRANSTransgendered
TRANSTransmitter
TRANSTransverse
TRANSTransparant
TRANSTransient Aircraft Summary Product (Wccs)
References in classic literature ?
If I were at home, no doubt I could get a translation of this poem, but I am abroad and can't; therefore I will make a translation myself.
I have a translation by Garnham, Bachelor of Arts, in the LEGENDS OF THE RHINE, but it would not answer the purpose I mentioned above, because the measure is too nobly irregular; it don't fit the tune snugly enough; in places it hangs over at the ends too far, and in other places one runs out of words before he gets to the end of a bar.
In the first part the greatest freedom has been used in reducing the narration into a narrow compass, so that it is by no means a translation but an epitome, in which, whether everything either useful or entertaining be comprised, the compiler is least qualified to determine.
The dissertations are the only part in which an exact translation has been attempted, and even in those abstracts are sometimes given instead of literal quotations, particularly in the first; and sometimes other parts have been contracted.
While laboring as a publisher Caxton himself continued to make translations, and in spite of many difficulties he, together with his assistants, turned into English from French no fewer than twenty-one distinct works.
48} I give the usual translation, but I do not believe the Greek will warrant it.
Hatch and others (with translation of paraphrase attributed to Andronicus of Rhodes), edited by E.
Of translations of Hesiod the following may be noticed: -- "The Georgicks of Hesiod", by George Chapman, London, 1618; "The Works of Hesiod translated from the Greek", by Thomas Coocke, London,
Sometimes even in translation the rhyme may be kept, as:--
Only then Levin recollected the title of the fantasia, and made haste to read in the Russian translation the lines from Shakespeare that were printed on the back of the program.
Still it seems to me that translation from one language into another, if it be not from the queens of languages, the Greek and the Latin, is like looking at Flemish tapestries on the wrong side; for though the figures are visible, they are full of threads that make them indistinct, and they do not show with the smoothness and brightness of the right side; and translation from easy languages argues neither ingenuity nor command of words, any more than transcribing or copying out one document from another.
The text is based on translations from the Grimms' Kinder und Hausmarchen by