AMRPC

(redirected from ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct)
AcronymDefinition
AMRPCABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct
AMRPCAthens Municipal-Regional Planning Commission (Athens, Greece)
References in periodicals archive ?
5 of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, which provides, in pertinent part, "[a] lawyer admitted to practice in this jurisdiction is subject to the disciplinary authority of this jurisdiction, regardless of where the lawyer's conduct occurs.
29) Florida adopted the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct on July 17, 1986.
Pera, Grading ABA Leadership on Legal Ethics Leadership: State Adoption of the Revised ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, 30 OKLA.
In July 1998, the ABA Commission on Advertising released a report entitled A Re-Examination Of The ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Pertaining to Client Development in Light of Emerging Technologies ("ABA White Paper") to address some of the ethical issues raised by the use of electronic communication to disseminate information concerning lawyers' services.
These restrictions would be altered under the commission's recommendations for revising the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct.
Given the recent modifications to Section 105A of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, which focuses on extending a lawyer's obligations of confidentiality to electronic records and communications including the use of reasonable efforts to safeguard against unauthorized access, ACE provides a clear solution by tailoring this privacy coverage to supplement a law firm's legal malpractice policy.
Remember, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct require:
But a look at the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct may find that one-size-call-fits-all.
Recommended that the Bar Board of Governors instruct its delegates to the ABA House of Delegates to oppose suggested changes to the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct on technology and confidentiality.
4: Florida Rules of Professional Conduct (FRPC), effective since 1986, were based upon the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and subsequently amended to reflect much of the ABA's "2000 Rules," approved by the ABA House of Delegates in 2002.
The ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct state that "[a] lawyer shall not represent a client if the representation of that client will be directly adverse to another client.