AGHE


Also found in: Medical.
AcronymDefinition
AGHEAssociation for Gerontology in Higher Education
AGHEAustralian Guide to Healthy Eating (Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society)
AGHEAssociation of Global Humanists and Ethics (Pakistan)
AGHEHydrofoil Research Ship
AGHEAir Ground Heat Exchanger
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References in periodicals archive ?
Parents are encouraged to compare current eating patterns of each family member with age-appropriate AGHE food group serve recommendations.
The current Australian guide, (6) which is soon to be updated to match the new NRVs, is called the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE).
One way of finding out about educational opportunities in gerontology is to request a computerized search of the data base maintained by the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), This can be done for a modest fee.
Australia's current guide, the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE), (1) is based on the National Health and Medical Research Council's 1994 Core Food Group (2) analysis, which translates nutrient requirements to food consumption recommendations.
There are obvious implications of the new NRVs such as the need for a review of the core food groups (CFGs) (2) and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE), (3) as the CFG recommendations were based on the old RDI targets and these, along with the previous dietary guidelines, informed the development of the AGHE.
General food guidance systems, such as the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) (9) and the Food Guide Pyramid, (10) outline the number of servings from core food groups required to meet nutritional requirements for the general population.
The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) is the official national food selection guide, including quantitative recommendations for 'core' food groups (meats, dairy, fruit and vegetables, and cereals) and is used widely for population-based dietary education and planning (13).
A draft basket of foods was selected based on recommendations of the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE), and using information on typical eating patterns from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey and data from local supermarket sales.
The aim of this study was to describe the foods self-reported consumed for breakfast by students participating in the QSBP on the day of the baseline survey and to categorise these foods using the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE).
The goal of that behaviour was healthy eating defined with reference to the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) (8) and the Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents in Australia (9).
The first five questions, about the number of serves recommended per day from five food groups, are derived from recommendations in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) for men and women aged 19 to 60 years (35).