ANZDATA

AcronymDefinition
ANZDATAAustralia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry
References in periodicals archive ?
Data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA Registry, 2009) showed that in 2008 31.8 % of Maori patients were referred less than three months prior to commencing dialysis.
Infection is one of the leading causes of death in Australian HD patients (ANZDATA Registry, 2017).
Data made available by the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA), the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), and World Bank were used to determine and predict the following: (1) Australia's gross domestic product (GDP); (2) total population in Australia; (3) RRT and CVD prevalence in Australia; (4) CKD-, RRT-, and CVD-related healthcare expenditure in Australia; and (5) total healthcare expenditure in Australia.
At the end of 2014, there were 12,091 people receiving dialysis, with over 2,610 new cases reported in 2014 (ANZDATA, 2015).
Brown, "Chapter 6: Peritoneal Dialysis," ANZDATA 2012 Annual Report--35th edition, 2012, http://www.anzdata.org .au/anzdata/AnzdataReport/35thReport/2012c06_peritoneal_ v3.pdf.
The 2002 Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry describes 88.5% of the 1694 patients commencing renal replacement therapy that year in Australia as hypertensive.
Each year in Australia approximately 16,000 adults will develop chronic kidney disease (CKD) (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013) and the majority will choose a form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) to manage it (ANZDATA Registry, 2016).
Figures from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) registry 2007 report show that of those on the transplant waiting list, 22 percent were Maori, 14 percent were Pacific Islander and six percent Asian.
In Australia, 30% of people on dialysis treatments self-care at home, with 20% using peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 65% of these using automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) (ANZDATA, 2015).
Subsequently, the age of people on dialysis has also increased from an average of 43 years in 1977 (Australian New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry [ANZDATA], 1978) to 65 years in 2014 (ANZDATA, 2015).