AQoL

AcronymDefinition
AQoLAssessment of Quality of Life
AQoLAustralian Quality of Life (research study; various organizations)
AQoLAsthma-Specific Quality of Life (respiratory medicine)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Improvement in all the respiratory parameters (FEV1%, PEFR%, ACS score and AQOL questionnaire score) between -4 week and 0 week were similar and highly significant (p<0.001) in both groups, and significant (p<0.05) improvement in all the respiratory parameters (FEV1%, PEFR%, ACS score and AQOL questionnaire score) were observed between 0 week and 12 week in both the groups.
The fourth section incorporated the four dimension Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL-4D) questionnaire (Q48-54), which was chosen as the only quality of life instrument which incorporated Australian preference weights (AQoL 2009).
The syntax algorithim 4D was run on the AQOL data, followed by the Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test for unevenly distributed data.
The assessments of quality of life (AQOL) scores were similar to mean values expected in a healthy 60-69 year old cohort.
(1999) The Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) instrument: a psychometric measure of health-related quality of life.
The AQoL consists of 15 items (attributes) covering five dimensions: illness (use of medicines, reliance on medicines and medical aid, need for regular treatment), independent living (assistance with self care, assistance with household tasks, mobility at home and community), social relationships (closeness and warmth, friendship and loneliness, family role), physical senses (vision, hearing, communication) and psychological wellbeing (sleep, low mood, pain) (Hawthorne et al 1999).
To provide a profile of health-related quality of life, each item on the AQoL is scored out of 3 (where 'A' scores 0, 'B' scores 1, 'C' scores 2, and 'D' scores 3).
The AQoL has high internal consistency (alpha = 0.81) (Hawthorne et al 1999) and in general correlates well to other MAU instruments (r = 0.75) such as the EQ5D (Hawthorne et al 2001).
The AQoL is sensitive to changes in health states (Hawthorne and Osborne 2005).
Hawthorne G, Osborne R (2005) Population norms and meaningful differences for the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) measure.
Hawthorne G, Richardson J, Day NA (2001) A comparison of the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) with four other generic utility instruments.
Hawthorne G, Richardson J, Osborne R (1999) The Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) instrument: a psychometric measure of health-related quality of life.