ASBAT

AcronymDefinition
ASBATAnti-Social Behaviour Action Team (UK)
ASBATAir-Sea Battle
References in periodicals archive ?
At Al Asbat gate, Palestinians managed to break the siege by Israeli regime forces, allowing dozens to confront them from the inside and thereby force the suspension of visits by the colonists.
Bulgaria is a legitimate target of al-Qaeda because it has sent its soldiers to support the US invaders in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Lebanon-based Sunni extremist group Asbat al-Ansar announced in October.
In January 2000 the government took action against Sunni Muslim extremists in the north who had attacked its soldiers, and it continues to act against groups such as Asbat al-Ansar, which has been linked to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida network, and other extremists.
He was the author of Al-Fawaid al-Zabita fi Asbat al-Rabita, Tashih al-Masail fil rad ala Maita Masail, and Al-Anhar al-Arbae.
(All that is on earth will perish; But will abide the Face of thy Lord.)"26 The various terms in Sufism such as negation (nafi), affirmation (asbat); annihilation/ obliteration (fana`)27 and subsistence/ establishment (baqa`) 28 find their root in the above quoted verse of the Qur`an.
Al-Qaida affiliated groups like Fatah al-Islam and Asbat al-Ansar recruit their members from Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon, where disaffected residents embrace an extremist ideology, Schweitzer added.
One additional concern is that al-Qaeda has significant interaction with Palestinians in Lebanon, where an al-Qaeda affiliate group called Asbat al-Ansar operates with utter impunity in the Ein al-Hilweh refugee camp.
This category includes groups such as al-Ittihad al-Islami (AIAI), the late Abu Musab Zarqawi's al-Qaeda in Mesopotamia (formerly Jamaat al Tawhid wal Jihad), Asbat al-Ansar, Ansar al Islam, Islamic Army of Aden, Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU), Jemaah Islamiya (JI), Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC), and the various Kashmiri Islamic groups based in Pakistan--e.g., Harakat ul Mujahidin (HUM), Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM), Laskar-e-Tayyiba (LET), and Laskar i Jhangvi (LiJ).
The names cropping up beside Fath al Islam include those of Jund al Sham and Asbat al Ansar, who are both entrenched inside the Ain al Helweh refugee camp behind Sidon.
Abderrazak Mahdjoub, an Algerian extradited to Italy following his arrest in Hamburg on an Italian warrant in November 2003, went on trial in Milan in March 2004 on charges of recruiting suicide bombers for Zarqawi's network and Asbat Al Ansar, an Islamic organisation in Iraq that has been blamed for much of the violence there.
Defendants include al-Qaida; Egyptian Islamic Jihad; Asbat al-Ansar; Al Gama'a al-Islamiya; and the Salafist Group for Call and Combat.
In addition to al Qaeda, other purported terrorist organizations named in the suit include Egyptian Islamic Jihad, Asbat Al-Ansar, Algama'a Al-Islamiyya, and the Salafist Group for Call and Combat.