AWNS


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AcronymDefinition
AWNSAnimation Weihnachtsmann Nikolaus Santa Claus (German Christmas show)
AWNSAcid Waste Neutralization System
References in periodicals archive ?
* Checking the chest, underbelly, and flank for cuts, skin tears, bruises, grass awns, or punctures.
In the stories above, you may have gleaned a few helpful hints about how to reduce the odds that your dog will be invaded by one of these evil awns and if she is, what you should do.
Grass awns were maintained at 4[degrees]C in a sterile tube and sent to the laboratory within 1 hour after extraction.
A frustrating fact about grass awns is they can cause a slew of different maladies, making diagnoses difficult.
Decrease, in the value of the measured traits, induced by leaf or awns removal or spike shading was expressed as percent relatively to the control as follow: % decline = [100*(Treated- control)/control].
The parent GD-153 remained best for spikelets per spike, grain yield per plant, spike density and GD-171 for spike length, while GD-102 for maximum awn length and grains per spike.
You should determine your regular veterinarian's level of experience and comfort in treating a grass awn infection.
The only foolproof way to truly keep a dog foxtail free in an area where the awns are present is to simply not visit there and even then, you can't be sure your dog won't be exposed.
Field experiments were designed, featuring natural infection by Puccinia triticina, to more precisely estimate the single and joint effects of awns and leaf rust resistance.
Along with cuts and bruises we have to check for ticks and even dangerous grass awns. In the past grass awn problems were something only common to Western states, but now with prairie restoration programs comes Canada rye and other dangerous seeds throughout much of the country.
The fatuoid naked oat materials with which we have worked have twisted geniculate awns on the lemmas of their primary and secondary florets, but they do not exhibit the suckermouth or shatter (Hoekstra et al., 2001).