ACCORD

(redirected from Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes)
AcronymDefinition
ACCORDACTS (Advanced Communications Technology and Services) Broad-Band Communications Joint Trials and Demonstrations
ACCORDAction to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (clinical trial)
ACCORDASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) and China Cooperative Operations in Response to Dangerous Drugs
ACCORDAfrican Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes
ACCORDApplication Coordonnée de Comptabilisation, d'Ordonnancement et de Règlement de la Dépense de l'Etat (French: Coordinated Implementation of Accounting, Scheduling and Regulations of State Expenditures)
ACCORDArms Control Community On-Line Repository of Treaty Data
ACCORDAdministration and Control of Contracting and Regional Data
ACCORDAssociated Citizens of Cushing Organized for Responsible Development
References in periodicals archive ?
Korley, M.D., Ph.D., from the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System in Michigan, and colleagues performed a case-control study of participants from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes trial to determine the discriminative ability of NfL levels for distinguishing between adults with diabetes mellitus who develop incident stroke and those who remain stroke free.
[22] Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Study Group, "Effects of intensive glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes," New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study randomized diabetic patients to an intensive therapy group with targeting [HbA.sub.1c] < 6.0% and a group receiving standard therapy with targeting [HbA.sub.1c] 7.0-7.9%.
* The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial, published in 2008, studied patients at risk for CVD, defined by either a prior history of CVD or [greater than or equal to]2 other cardiovascular risk factors.
Miller and his team performed a post hoc analysis of the ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) study to determine if there was any difference in glucose control, tolerability, cardiovascular disease, or all-cause mortality according to patients' age at randomization.
The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial tested this hypothesis by determining whether a therapeutic strategy that targeted a typical Hb [A.sub.1c] value of <6.0%, compared with a strategy that targeted an Hb [A.sub.1c] value of 7.0%-7.9%, would reduce CVD (1).
Instead of focusing on patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia, an elevated serum level of triglycerides, and depressed HDL cholesterol, the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) lipid trial enrolled a representative sampling of 5,518 patients with diabetes and a range of triglyceride and HDL cholesterol levels.
NEW ORLEANS -- Low blood glucose levels fail to explain the excess deaths observed in an intensive control group study referred to as the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial, according to a report presented at the ADA Scientific Sessions.
For example, there is the concern about the possible linkage of rosiglitazone and the risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as the reaction to the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study, which appeared to show a small increased cardiovascular risk associated with intensified glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.
Researchers from the ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) clinical trial compared a medical strategy aimed at near-normal blood sugar levels -- below current recommendations -- to a strategy to reach more standard blood sugar levels.
Mottl, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues evaluated the long-term kidney effects of aggressive control of glycemia (hemoglobin A1c <6 percent), blood pressure (systolic BP <120 mm Hg), and lipids among participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study.
The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study is among the largest trials conducted in adults with type 2 diabetes at high risk of cardiovascular events.