AAE

(redirected from Acute Asthma Exacerbations)
AcronymDefinition
AAEAll About Eve
AAEAmerican Association of Endodontists
AAEAustralian Air Express (courier company)
AAEApple Airport Extreme
AAEApple Airport Express
AAEAcceptance Acknowledgement Exception
AAEAssociation des Anciens Elèves (French: Alumni Association; various universities)
AAEAssistant Account Executive
AAEAfrican-American English
AAEAeronautical and Astronautical Engineering
AAEAssociation for Astronomy Education
AAEAssociation of American Educators
AAEAquifex Aeolicus
AAEAddis Ababa, Ethiopia
AAEArmy Acquisition Executive
AAEAffirmative Action Employer
AAEAfrican-American Experience
AAEAssociation of Art Education
AAEApple Airport Extreme (software)
AAEAccredited Airport Executive (American Association of Airport Executives)
AAEAverage Absolute Error
AAEAluminum Athletic Equipment Co.
AAEAmerican Association of Engineers
AAEAmerican Academy of English
AAEArms, Ammunition and Explosives
AAEArchery Association of Europe
AAEAgriculture and Applied Economics
AAEAssociation of Art Editors
AAEAbove Aerodrome Elevation
AAEAllgemeine Anschalterlaubnis (Telekom)
AAEAgent Administratif d'Entreprise
AAEAverage Annual Earnings
AAEAmsterdam Aviation Economics
AAEAuxiliar de Acção Educativa
AAEAnnaba, Algeria - Les Salines (Airport Code)
AAEArago Automation Engine (computing)
AAEAsociación Asperger España
AAEAsian Amusement Expo
AAEAmericans for Affordable Electricity
AAEAwareness Art Ensemble
AAEAssociation Acadienne d'Éducation
AAEAssociation for the Advancement of Education
AAEAide Aux Entreprises (France)
AAEAmerican Alternatives Energy Corporation
AAEAge at Exam
AAEAerospace Auxiliary Equipment
AAEAlpha Amylase Enzyme
AAEAnglo-American Establishment
AAEAmerican Association of Entrepreneurs (since 1997; Washington, DC)
AAEAirborne Armament Equipment
AAEAdvanced Attitude Epoch
AAEAgency Acquisition Executive
AAEAssociation of Automotive Employers
AAEArzt, Ashby and Easterling (metallurgy)
AAEAdvanced Applied Entomology
AAEArmy Aviation Element
AAEAutomatic Adaptive Equalization
AAEAdministration Acquisition Executive
AAEActive-Assistive Exercise
AAEAviation Armament Equipment
AAEAlliance for Art Education
AAEAdvanced Aerospace Engineering (Romania)
AAEArtillery Accuracy Effectiveness
AAEApplications, Admissions and Enrollment
AAEAcute Asthma Exacerbations
AAEAllied Acquisition Executive
AAEAutomated Attack Execution (software)
AAEAlternative Agriculture Exposition
AAEAssociation of Indonesian Aluminum Extruders
AAEAssociation Amicale Energies (French: Friendly Energy Association)
AAEAircraft Appliances and Equipment Ltd (Brampton, Ontario, Canada)
AAEAssociation Arc Electrique (French: Electric Arc Association)
AAEAtmospheric Air Ejector
References in periodicals archive ?
Dexamethasone for acute asthma exacerbations in children: a meta-analysis.
Acute asthma exacerbations are largely preventable [2], and so are ED visits and hospitalizations for this reason [9, 20-22].
Another limitation is the lack of biological surrogate markers like cysteinyl leukotriene levels which have shown to be higher in acute asthma exacerbations. It is possible that these levels may have been reduced in the patients but did not translate into clinical effectiveness yet.
Previous studies have suggested a link between hMPV infection and acute asthma exacerbations in children, and between other respiratory viruses and exacerbations in children and adults, but this is the first to link hMPV infections with such exacerbations in adults, the investigators noted.
Stressor-linked alterations in the immune system may predispose to respiratory tract infections (35,36), which may trigger acute asthma exacerbations. Stress hormones influence immunoglobulin and cytokine expression and thus may increase a genetically predisposed individual's risk of developing asthma.
As salmeterol has a slower onset of action of 15 to 30 minutes, it should not be used for the treatment of an acute asthma exacerbation. Salmeterol is commonly used in pediatric asthma patients to prevent symptoms of nocturnal asthma and prevent exercise-induced asthma.
(8) Cincinnati Children's Hospital's evidence-based guidelines from 1998 also recommend MDI/S for children aged >1 year with acute asthma exacerbations? This guideline suggests using 4 to 8 puffs from a 90 [mu]g albuterol MDI at 1- to 2-minute intervals every 20 minutes for 1 hour, then every i to 4 hours subsequently.
Are metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) with holding chambers (spacers) more effective than nebulizers in delivering brochodilator medication in children with acute asthma exacerbations?
It offers no benefit for acute asthma exacerbations. For children, intravenous aminophylline may improve the clinical course of severe asthma attacks.
Some parents worry that the intense physical activity often associated with competitive sports at this level may precipitate acute asthma exacerbations. Suggested activity plans allow children with asthma to participate in activities of their choice.
Incorporating MDI use in the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations may help dispel the misconception of many patients that the nebulizer is a more "powerful" way of treating asthma.
Background Multiple studies have demonstrated that for acute asthma exacerbations, metered dose inhalers (MDIs) with attached valved spacers are as effective, if not more effective, than nebulizers.[1] Homemade spacers made from more readily available plastic bottles or polystyrene cups are sometimes substituted for conventional spacers.
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